ME vs. CFS vs. SEID Information & Advocacy Chart

  • Click on the chart for the full-size version, as your browser may have resized the one below.
  • If you’d like an extra large version (say, for special eyes), click here.
  • To download as a PDF file (which I optimized for printing), click here.
  • For Facebook upload onlydownload this special Facebook size of the graphic, because Facebook has annoying rules about photo dimensions.
  • On Twitter? Click here now to Retweet/Quote/etc. the graphic.

ME CFS SEID chart via arainbowatnight


  • Click on the chart for the full-size version, as your browser may have resized the one above.
  • If you’d like an extra large version (say, for special eyes), click here.
  • To download as a PDF file (which I optimized for printing), click here.
  • For Facebook upload onlydownload this special Facebook size of the graphic, because Facebook has annoying rules about photo dimensions.
  • On Twitter? Click here now to Retweet/Quote/etc. the graphic.
    • If you try to share the image anywhere else and it uploads blurry, link to the direct image.

You may share any of the graphics or downloads linked in this post.

Today is International Awareness Day for Chronic Immunological and Neurological Diseases. Feel free to share this page or download the graphic and share it on social media with friends, family, and your circles. Like most diseases, people never hear of this one until it happens to them or someone they love, but facts about classic M.E. have effectively been buried beneath 30 years of misinformation. Many have lived with these diagnoses for years and never heard any of this before! It doesn’t have to be like this.

I’m hoping people diagnosed with CFS (or diagnosed with “ME” but by using CFS criteria, which happens often in places like the UK) will read this and think twice about how they got their diagnosis, begin looking for the real cause of their symptoms with a doctor’s help. Or, if they do unfortunately meet the criteria for M.E., they will learn what they’re really up against, how to manage this disease appropriately, and might even be able to find specialists to help with specific symptoms. Learning that you have the real M.E. also gives you the opportunity to slow disease progression with things like mitochondrial support, immunoglobulin replacement therapy, treatment for secondary infections, and energy management such as pacing and switching in contrast to forced exercise (repeated episodes of paralysis can cause additional permanent damage to the muscles; those unaware they have M.E. wouldn’t know this).

Just remember: Whatever your symptoms, whatever your diagnosis, all of us in this community understand your suffering and want the best for each other. If you’ve had a long day of advocating, here’s some very good news and your invitation to rest.

With Love,

a rainbow at night


Quick links:

A Very Special Way of Life

© a rainbow at night

I’m not used to living this kind of life… It’s so different from what I was supposed to have, so different from what I was used to…

I barely see anyone. I barely go anywhere. I have no local friends and I think I’ve permanently lost my ability to drive. Disease puts me in bed an average of 23 hours per day, or at least to some area where I can lean back and my legs are propped up to ensure proper circulation. When you tell people these things, they immediately pity you and interpret it as a bad kind of life, or a sad kind of life, “oh you poor thing…” But Continue reading

The Parts of ME: What If It Were You?

IMG_20140617_225939Throughout this series, but especially in this part, I only ask you to remain open. But what does that mean? To quote Thich Nhat Hanh: “Usually when we hear or read something new, we just compare it to our own ideas. If it is the same, we accept it and say it is correct; if it is not, we say it is incorrect. In either case, we learn nothing.” So by being open, we agree to allow the information in and integrate it with the use of our intelligence instead of thoughtless reaction.

Continue reading

The Parts of ME: Introduction & History: How did we get here?

IMG_20140617_225939

It takes a long time for me to integrate new information.

And as anyone in the ME community knows, we’ve had a ton of that since February. Instead of blindly powering through, waiting has given me a month to gather facts, opinions, and input from our advocacy leaders, my trusted friends, and even the IOM committee members. The best way for me to write and for you to read (that is, if you want) is to break it into parts.

Please note that each post will be able to stand on its own: Don’t fret about having to remember plot-lines from week to week; this is not a story. This is definitely. not. a story.

All right. Fasten your seat-belts, gather your friends, because here we go. It’s time to make some sense out of all this.


The Parts of M.E. (Upcoming posts)
  1. Introduction & History: How did we get here?
  2. What if it were you?
  3. Does “Post Exertional Malaise (PEM)” exist in other diseases?
  4. The IOM Committee Speaks Out
  5. The Problem with M.E.-only Advocacy, and How SEID May Help
  6. Does encephalomyelitis really exist in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)?
  7. The ICC or CCC as an M.E. definition: Are we promoting bad science?
  8. Why do we advocate?
Some of these might be combined or further segregated as I go along. Using everything I’ve sporadically written over the past month, I’ll compile and post these hopefully, potentially once a week, starting now.

Let’s begin by clearing something up: How did we get here? The confusion between M.E. and similar states has always been a point of controversy. Today’s over-inclusion involves M.E. vs Any other disease with chronic fatigue; pre-CFS the over-inclusion was of M.E. vs. Any other disease with chronic post-viral fatigue. These illnesses have also always been thought by many to be purely psychological in origin…along with 95% of all other ailments, because that’s just what people did back then. (Hysterical wandering uterus, anyone?)

But why hasn’t M.E. moved forward with all the others, especially after decades of documented outbreaks and with so much research proving it’s an acquired disease of non-mental origin? The major denial of M.E. in both the US and UK has stemmed from people with too much power failing to examine a single patient.

McEvedy and Beard–both psychiatrists*–wrote their deplorable 1970 re-analysis of the 1955 Royal Free epidemic without doing a physical examination on a single patient, basing their feedback on data which they decided could just as easily have been hysteria…not out of some moral obligation to scrutinize data, but because *McEvedy was a psychiatry student who needed an easy paper to write for his PhD.* Professor Hooper writes of this:

“McEvedy stated that he did not examine any patients and undertook only the most cursory examination of medical records. This was a source of great distress to Melvin Ramsay who carried out the first meticulous study of the Royal Free outbreak. The outcome of McEvedy’s work has been described by one of the ME/CFS charities as “the psychiatric fallacy”.” (1)

Dr. Hyde writes of his personal visit with McEvedy in 1988:

“Why had he written up the Free Hospital epidemics as hysteria without any careful exploration of the basis of his thesis? I asked.

His reply was devastating.

He said, ‘It was an easy PhD, why not’.” (2)

While over in the US, it is well-known that the CDC did the exact same thing: In response to several 1980s M.E. outbreaks, CDC investigators looked only at patient charts–NOT actual patients–and returned to their offices to make jokes about our presumed “hysteria.” It wasn’t until the doctors attempting to manage these outbreaks took over $200,000 of their own money to pay for MRIs, that they found their patients had brain lesions indistinguishable from those found in people with AIDS; because these findings were not seen in ALL patients, they were not taken seriously, despite being consistent with myalgic encephalomyelitis. In 1988, the CDC christened the continuing outbreaks as a new illness–chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)–effectively because three M.E. experts left the committee early due to a lack of patient information and the remaining committee’s preoccupation with Epstein-Barr Syndrome. (2)

From the criteria that developed to study CFS (which was only intended “to provide a rational basis for evaluating patients who have chronic fatigue of undetermined cause” because physicians did not take the illness seriously), we have helped cultivate an old mess that still exists today: Thousands of people diagnosed with everything under the sun, whose illness is being called myalgic encephalomyelitis. This includes thousands who don’t meet even a single criterion for what was actually M.E. before the invention of CFS or the watered down post-CFS model of ME that exists in many countries today.

ME CFS SEID criteria-only

As you can see, this is the reason some diagnosed with CFS do have M.E., and the reason much research does still apply to M.E. even if the titles “CFS” or “ME/CFS” are used. The trick lies in checking the methodology: If patients were selected using the ICC or CCC (especially in addition to another criteria), there’s an excellent chance the results could apply to classic ME. If they were selected to meet certain additional M.E.-like criteria, such as a post-viral onset, even better. But if patients only had to meet one CFS criteria (or something equally nonsensical, such as the UK’s “NICE guidelines for CFS/ME”), proceed with caution, because this may mean the only thing the participants had in common was “a fatiguing illness.”

“Even if the truth is buried for centuries, it will eventually come out and thrive.” (Burmese Proverb)

To be continued…

a rainbow at night

(P.S. – I thought I should finally publish a Facebook page so I can be engaged with the wonderful groups and people there, and also share things that are both too long for my twitter and too short for blog posts. Watch it for updates of new posts, things relevant to ‪‎Myalgic Encephalomyelitis‬ and related diseases, ‪Lyme Disease‬ and related content, ‪Buddhism‬ and ‪spirituality‬ (theists and non-theists welcome), ‪Mindfulness‬ and other meditations, ‪‎coping‬, ‪advocacy, and more. You CAN post to the page, but things will be moderated–checked by me for inappropriate content before they go public–to keep it a safe place: Differing opinions are NOT seen as confrontational, just don’t talk down to others. :) Thank you for your “Like”!)

Explaining to Those with “ME/CFS” That They Cannot Have Both

ME CFS SEID criteria-only

Here are some things I used to think about people who tried to tell me chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was different from myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME):

  1. They’re just trying to cause a problem where there isn’t one.
  2. They’re “those advocacy-type people” who “make a big deal out of everything.”
  3. They just want it to sound more serious, when it’s actually the same illness.
  4. It really doesn’t matter what people call it; they just want their disease to be “special.”

Yes, I *legitimately used to think these things.*

Have you ever wondered why people continue using terms like “ME/CFS” “CFIDS/ME” (and now “ME/SEID”), despite being confronted with information that clearly details their differences? Ever wanted to inform someone you care about, but aren’t sure how? Continue reading

It’s not easy, it’s just Now.

The Nutcracker

“Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.” (Oscar Wilde)

When I look back at all that I’ve done over the past year, it really blows my mind. And I did it all because I first made the choice to live and enjoy within the confines of my circumstances, just like I did last year. I set in my mind what I wanted, made whatever arrangements I could on my own to help them manifest, and let the Universe work out the rest based on what I needed to experience.

If I wasn’t supposed to have something yet (or at all), well it wouldn’t have been from my lack of trying.

I’m not completely certain of the point for me writing this… I know the things I lived, I don’t need further documentation. I don’t imagine they’d be all that interesting to anyone else, in the same way your baby photos are only important to you, and slide shows of your vacations need to be ambushed upon unsuspecting house guests if you plan to share them.

Even if I were to sit here and explain how none of it would have happened if I just blindly accepted the identity of “sick person” that most family members and even doctors wanted to give me (and that for too many years I gave to myself, as well)… “Sick people” don’t live life, they wait until they’re not so sick anymore to start enjoying themselves again, right? They wait until they’re better, don’t they…? (Not so much.) Continue reading