Remission from Fibromyalgia?

I don’t talk much about Fibromyalgia (FM) because it’s been so many years since I had it. A topic I read about even less, is the remission from this syndrome. But I still remember what it felt like and what it entailed, particularly before its supposed symptoms got muddied by research done on people who have innumerable other conditions, or co-morbid conditions.

I suppose I’ll start with an explaination of what is it/how it feels. Then I’ll explain what I did to help my own case, that eventually led to a remission.


Fibromyalgia is a a pain syndrome that is usually triggered by a stressful event, such as a car crash, surgery, accident, severe infection, or another illness worsening/starting; more or less, it’s the consequence of something else. The pain is primarily in the muscles, and the tendons that support the joints, lending to severe pain and joint stiffness, but without inflammation. The syndrome does not actually damage the joints or muscles–it just feels like it! There is an extreme sensitivity to pressure (allodynia). Things that would normally not hurt, such as getting a gentle hug, become extremely and lingeringly painful. The pain never stops, and is absolutely everywhere, all the time, but may focus more around the tender point locations necessary for diagnosis. Someone with FM will be hurting when they are sitting, standing, and lying down. Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ) is very common, and a major contributor to headaches.

Sleep problems include an inability to fall asleep, but particularly staying asleep. Someone with FM may wake up every hour, all night long, without anything to help cure the root of the problem, which is the brain’s inability to conduct normal sleep waves. FM is thus also accompanied by a great degree of fatigue, that may or may not be managable. Cognitive problems are multiple and very prominent, including things like an almost complete lack of short term memory, working memory, any ability to recall the names of every day items, and silly things like placing the television remote in the freezer and the frozen peas on top the entertainment center. (Or pouring your milk in the trash and the tea down the sink… I may or may not be speaking from personal experience…)

Other symptoms include tingling and numbness of the extremities (your arms and legs), muscle spasms, cold sensitivity (someone with FM can always tell when the weather is about to change), and a high rate of restless legs syndrome. Stress is not the cause of fibromyalgia, but stress exacerbates any chronic disease, so proper management of stress is essential to keeping your pain, fatigue, and sleep problems as mild as possible.

Fibromyalgia is not an inflammatory disease. It is also not a progressive disease, though symptoms wax and wane over the course of several months, and can be disabling. If you are experiencing inflammation and/or illness progression, see another doctor for other illness possibilities besides fibromyalgia, which may only be a symptom of another, more serious disease process or underlying infection.


We know Fibromyalgia can disappear when it is associated with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. But what about otherwise? Does treating the main disease causing the FM, make the FM go away? That certain wasn’t the case when I fell ill; my FM stayed when the M.E. went into remission, and went away after I got Lyme disease! What makes this even more difficult to determine, is its consistent over-diagnosis. For instance, there are probably thousands of people who have been diagnosed with FM who actually have M.E., who just had the unfortunate circumstance of being diagnosed with FM first, and just stopped looking for other explanations. And nearly everyone I know with Lyme disease initially had a diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia (or both) before they found out the actual cause of their symptoms; I wish I were only exaggerating!

I’m not sure where I fit in with that group. Things happened to me in the reverse order that would otherwise “make sense.” But I will write about that next, in a post describing the differences between CFS, M.E., FM, and Lyme disease.

For right now, I want to talk a little about how I treated the syndrome, in case that might be of help to others. I don’t claim these to be the cure–I think it most likely remitted of its own natural accord–but they did help me immensely, and I could always, always tell when I was forgetting one of them. Maybe someone else will also find relief?

  1. Magnesium.

    You’ve probably read about this all over the internet, right? Sure you have. Well, it’s not just hype. I’m not going to pretend to know the mechanics behind why it helped, but daily supplementation with magnesium not only reduced my Migraine attacks (a condition I was born with) from twice a month to twice a year, but greatly reduced my muscle pain. I’ve read many an article overanalyzing the right “type” of magnesium to take for Fibromyalgia, but I can only tell you this: I bought the plain ole Magnesium oxide with chelated Zinc from Walmart and it worked without fail. One important thing to note before you dismiss this one: I’ve always had normal serum magnesium in blood tests. The amount in your blood is not an accurate way to determine the actual amount of magnesium in your body.

  2. Foam mattress topper

    This might should actually be number one… It’s that important. You have to understand that fibromyalgia is made worse by contact (in general, really, but especially) with the pressure points…which, if you’ve been diagnosed, you might know are practically everywhere. It should then be easy to grasp why relieving this pressure whilst sleeping is absolutely essential to easing your symptoms, especially when you’re pressing on them for eight hours at once. Invest in this, no matter what. You will not regret it. I couldn’t sleep on something that didn’t have my two inches of bed foam for even one night. When I would try to visit friends and family and sleep there, I would wake up after a couple of hours in excrutiating pain, from the pressure on these tender points. Sleeping better will also help your cognitive abilities (memory and mental functions) improve.

    • Also, for TMJ-related pain and/or head pressure, invest in an amazing pillow. You deserve it, and you need it! It’s all about support and relieving pressure on a body that interprets pressure as pain. I’ve personally been using Simmons Latex Foam Pillow (I cannot stand memory foam) and mine lasted 7 years before needing replacement–you will get your money’s worth!
  3. Protein.

    You know what honestly made me start increasing my amount of protein? It was back in the day when Montel Williams still had Sylvia Browne (a world reknown psychic) on his show on Wednesdays. Every time someone mentioned having fibromyalgia (which was largely unheard of back then), she’d tell them to eat more protein (and less sugar). I figured, it couldn’t hurt me one bit to try it, so I did. And I’ve been doing it ever since. (I’m not vouching for her abilities or inabilities one way or the other, but that information helped me. I now also know that people with infections requires 50% more protein in their diet than those without, so that’s another reason for me to continue.) I made a pact with myself to get an adequate source of protein every single day for two weeks to see if it made a difference. Obviously, it did! For me, it was chicken, and luckily there are hundreds of ways to prepare it so I didn’t get bored. For vegetarians it might be soy, or something similarly protein-rich that contains all essential amino acids, but I noticed I had more energy and was not as weak. I highly recommend you try the same test.

    • We all know too much sugar is bad for us. I switched to honey instead of sugar in my coffee, and cut down on my intake of white-flour, empty-calorie foods (which admittedly wasn’t very difficult since I didn’t eat a lot of that stuff to begin with). Honey is structurally different than sugar, containing mostly fructose and glucose (instead of sucrose), so your body can use more of its properties for energy instead of donating it to your fat reserves. =)
  4. Aloe vera.

    If I had a dime for every person who told me “thank you” for telling them about this one! Fibromyalgia is, without fail, associated with some degree of irritable bowel syndrome; if ever a case existed without IBS, I’ve never heard of it. This stuff will help if your digestion is too slow or too fast (and most IBS sufferers cycle in-and-out throughout, sometimes, even the same day). I’ve had people tell me they’ve even been able to start eating foods they previously couldn’t touch! Hopefully, if you try this, you’ll have the same reaction?

    Puritan’s Pride recently changed their aloe vera gel capsules, and I’ve noticed that even though the strength hasn’t changed, I now need two of these daily to give me the same effect as one of their old-model capsules. :\ But I’ve been taking one (well now, two) a day for at least eight years. It has many other health benefits, but mostly, it’s to protect the intestinal tract and help keep things from acting out, whether one extreme or the other. Note that it’s very important to consume the inner aloe vera leaf gel, not just the ground leaf, like you may also find if you’re searching for an aloe vera product. People have also told me they get relief from drinking it, but the gel capsules are much simpler, if you ask me.

  5. Flexeril.

    This is one of the first things your doctor used to give you for Fibromyalgia before Lyrica came around. It’s a muscle relaxant that some say is similar to tricyclic antidepressants (but you’re not taking it to cure some delusional illness belief), while others say it’s more similar to cyproheptadine (which is typically an allergy medication that has an extensive list of other uses)… My vote is on the latter, because I’m extremely sensitive to it, like I am to cyproheptadine. The point is this: People with fibromyalgia do not enter the restorative stage of sleep as often as healthy people, so whenever you do, you have to make it count.

    Flexeril (and other similar drugs, but this is the one usually handed out) makes it to where your muscles relax during those rare restorative sleep stages, allowing your body to heal more than if you hadn’t taken anything. The difference is noticable, particular when you’re in one of those “waking up every hour” phases that leave you a zombie during the day, and contributes substantially to the “fibro fog” part of the illness. You may not be able to keep from awakening fifty times a night, but at least you’ll get the most out of whatever sleep you do get. Now, I eventually had to switch to Robaxin (methocarbamol, another muscle relaxant) because I couldn’t tolerate the sedative effect of Flexeril, but just be sure to try something.

  6. Exercise daily.

    If you’ve made it this far down the list, I hope you’ll stick with me through this section! I cannot stress enough (1) how much exercise is essential for fibromyalgia, nor (2) how difficult it is to get started. Second to no other treatment does it improve fatigue and stamina, and only second to the mattress topper did it improve my pain (i.e., it helped a lot). I could always feel my symptoms worsen when I hadn’t exercised for a day or two. The type of exercise I’m talking about is, for all intents and purposes, graded exercise therapy. This is the type of exercise that studies claim helps chronic fatigue syndrome, but don’t mistake this for being a treatment for M.E., which again, is not the same as CFS. I absolutely could not exercise until my M.E. began to go into remission. Only then was I able to very slowly start doing exercise, gradually adding on more and more activity.

    The first goal is to have fifteen minutes of activity a day. At first, I could only walk laps around my house in five increments of three minutes each, spread out across the day. Next, I moved on to three increments of five minutes each (i.e., more activity at once). Also, every morning I would sit up, and very slowly rotate all of my joints, to fight the terrible morning stiffness; it was practically the only way I could move, particularly during the colder months. Then I started adding in the gentle stretching, using a similar method: First, five minutes a day of very slow, gentle stretching, only as far as my muscles could go, and eventually I was able to stretch for a full fifteen minute routine at once, with some music to make it more enjoyable.

    Do not try to do it all at once at first, nor force yourself to stretch like a “normal” person would–you are not normal! Even with this graded approach, it was still unbelievably painful, and followed the next day by a huge increase in pain. But with fibromyalgia, you don’t stop just because it hurts the next day; you cannot, or you will lose whatever progress your body has accomplished. The first two weeks were absolute hell. I was exhausted and beyond sore the next day, and moreso the day after that, and so forth, until “the pain stage” (as I not-so-affectionately call it) finally passed. Then I started to reap the benefits of my very hard labor, and noticed that my symptoms were actually worse if I didn’t exercise. (Only someone with FM can understand how mind-numbingly painful it is just to try and stretch for five minutes at a time!)

    Important: This is the exact opposite of treating myalgic encephalomyelitis, and in my opinion, the biggest proof that M.E., CFS, and FM are not the same thing. If your muscles become inconsolably weak and begin to fail the next day, and worser still every additional day to the point that they may even literally stop working, you have more going on than “just” Fibromyalgia. Additional exercise will causes illness progression in M.E., so STOP. (Also possible, if not M.E., is that you may have Lyme disease and/or Babesiosis, chronic viral infection, hyperthyroidism, et cetera; i.e. other illnesses that cause muscle weakness in response to exercise, with no eventual benefit.) But this is NOT the same as experiencing more pain or fatigue like you would with Fibromyalgia, because let me be the first to state the obvious: You are going to hurt, and be exhausted, and not want to continue. But I can also tell you on behalf of myself and everyone else who’s ever successfully initiated an exercise routine with Fibromyalgia: It will help you.

Am I cured forever? Maybe. I have days where something strange will happen–a herx from my medicine, a day of severe stress, a storm passing through–where I will get a rush of pain that feels just like fibromyalgia, and leads me to think the mechanisms behind it may not actually be gone as much as they’re just not currently active. But I no longer suffer from its trademark symptoms. Even the type of cognitive problems I experience now, with the M.E. and Lyme disease, are different than that which accompanied the Fibromyalgia. And I no longer have chronic pain in all of my muscles and tendons, irritable bowel syndrome, or trouble waking up 10-20 times per night.

And I thank God for that, because if I had to deal with that terrible illness on top of the severe disease I already battle, I don’t know what my life would be like, or if I’d even still have one. I can only keep hoping that it never gets re-triggered, especially since there is practically no information out there about the reoccurence of FM in myalgic encephalomyelitis… I have the feeling though, that with all I’ve been through the past five years, if it were going to reappear, wouldn’t it have already done so?

a rainbow at night

Black bean brownies, anyone?

Time for something lighthearted now, yes? Last week I made black bean brownies. Yes, you read correctly: Brownies made from black beans. The recipe I used is this one, but I altered it so that in addition to being gluten free, dairy free, and soy free, they’re also sugar free. :) Use these directions if you’re feeling brave enough to consider a baked delight with beans instead of flour (and remember, chocolate comes from beans!).

Ingredients

  • 1 (15.5 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup Xylitol
  • 1 teaspoon instant coffee (technically optional, but highly recommended)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder (also optional, but recommended if you want cake-like brownies)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (160 degrees C). Lightly grease an 8×8 square baking dish.
  2. Combine the black beans, eggs, oil, cocoa powder, salt, vanilla extract, xylitol, instant coffee, and any optional ingredients in a blender; blend until smooth; pour the mixture into the prepared baking dish.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven until the top is dry and the edges start to pull away from the sides of the pan, about 30 minutes.

Nutritional Information

Serving Size 1/16 of a recipe
Servings Per Recipe 16

Amount Per Serving
Calories 126
Calories from Fat 48

% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5.3g 8 %
Saturated Fat 1.8g 9 %
Cholesterol 40mg 13 %
Sodium 144mg 6 %
Potassium 139mg 4 %
Total Carbohydrates 18.1g 6 %
Dietary Fiber 2.6g 11 %
Protein 3.3g 7 %

Vitamin A < 1 %
Vitamin C 1 %
Calcium 2 %
Iron 10 %
Thiamin 5 %
Niacin 7 %
Vitamin B6 2 %
Magnesium 8 %
Folate 12 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Of course you can add walnuts or anything else you might like. The purpose of the instant coffee is to bring out the flavor of the cocoa. Also, I didn’t use baking powder, and my entire family was thrown off by the texture, so you probably want to add it; I’ve never met a brownie I didn’t like–fudge-like or cake-like–so it didn’t matter to me!

For my version of these, I lowered the original recipe’s temperature because Xylitol requires this. Xylitol is a popular sweetener in the Lyme world, because not only is it a natural alternative sweetener for folks like us who need to be on reduced-carb and reduced-sugar diets, but it actually helps reduce levels of candida yeast! It tastes exactly like sugar, but please don’t take this as an excuse to over-indulge. First off, studies have shown that the absence of sugar (glucose) is actually more beneficial to the reduction of candida levels than is the addition of Xylitol. In other words, don’t think that just because you eat still sugar but also eat xylitol, that the xylitol will take care of the candida, because it won’t. Also, xylitol (like all sugar alcohols) can have a laxitive effect if you consume too much!

But otherwise, happy sweet tooths, my dear readers. :) You can find Xylitol at most all health food stores, but it’s also available online under names like XyloSweet.

a rainbow at night

A positive post, with more improvement!

I’ve set some goals for myself:

  1. Brush teeth standing up.
  2. Get out of wheelchair.
  3. Cook for myself.
  4. DRIVE again.
  5. Be able to sit up straight, before I get back problems.

I’ve even already made progess with a few of them. The other day I was able to stand while brushing my teeth, and I’ve been doing it ever since. =) And I’ve been out of my wheelchair most of the time. Yesterday, I even danced! My POTS symptoms, as I mentioned in last post, are much improved but it just depends upon the time of day. I’m trying at various intervals to sit up straight, but I can’t push it too much. I only just now became able to sit up on my own at all; I mustn’t go too far! I now eat twice a day, every day, with lots of healthy snacks in between, and haven’t needed to supplement with Ensure as much. I don’t have as much digestion-related dysautonomia, so I don’t have to split up my meals like I have been for the past two months. It’s such a relief. Since my hospitalization, I was subsconsiously on edge because I never knew what would trigger that domino-effect of terrible symptoms, but I finally feel stable again.

I’m still seeing things. I get headaches every evening around 4-5 o’clock, which has been my pattern since starting the the Rifampin in January. After the Zithro in the late evening (around 6pm), they get worse. Last night my neck was very stiff; it was difficult to even turn my head to the side. I need ibuprofen almost daily at around the 4-5pm interval, as well. The lymph nodes in my throat begin to ache and I feel generally inflamed. I’m lucky that after a decade of taking it, I can still tolerate the ibuprofen, which I attribute to always, ALWAYS taking it with food, or a full glass of milk to coat the stomach. (The aloe vera gel I’ve taken every day for the past seven years probably doesn’t hurt, either.)

Probably the most amazing news I have, is that my 2nd Lyme flare cycle–which I’m near positive began after taking grapefruit seed extract (GFSE) in July of 2010–is, from what I can tell, vanishing. GFSE is known to be a cyst-buster, so my best assumption is that.. it actually did, and the result was another set of replicating Lyme bacteria? This 2nd flare cycle was always milder than my “main” flare cycle (which occurs roughly around the 16-20th), but still encompassed the same type of symptoms: Left sided problems, spine pain, cardiac arrhythmias, severe headaches, and higher fever.

I made a brief mention of this last month, while I was wearing the holter monitor and expecting it to pick up on the arrhythmias that would be happening near the beginning of April… Only to find out, nothing happened at the beginning of April! And this month is the same. I’ve not had any fever, nor severe headache, nor explosion of arrhythmia, nor spine problems. There was the neck pain from last night that I mentioned, and I had one episode of spontaneous arrhythmia yesterday, but this is nothing compared to what “should” be happening. This must mean something very good. =)

Also, I don’t think I ever got to mention my cardiologist appointment on the seventh. He basically said there was nothing there but a fast heartbeat…which is ludicrous, because 90% of the time when I had to press the alert button, I was lying down with a normal heart pace. :\ Unfortunately my appt was early in the morning and I wasn’t able to probe deeper and dispute his “it’s just fast” theory. Doctors are trained to not worry the patient unecessarily, so my best guess is, since he kept repeating “it’s nothing dangerous,” is that whatever was there, he doesn’t think is enough to cause concern. Because of this vanishing 2nd flare cycle, I never did get to record the main, most-troubling arrhytmias that I was having… Which is bittersweet, right? I’m glad that they’re gone, but I wish they had happened while something some recording!!!

I think I’ll end this entry with a new ability scale checkpoint. :) As of right now I think myself to be at.. 20% physical, 35% cognitive, and 28% symptom severity. I had went downwards since my last checkpoint, but I’m back up again, so my physical ability is about the same, I’m slighlty better cognitively, and much better (compared a 7%, at least) with symptom severity.

My mother and I are planning a trip to Walmart for tomorrow. Two sickly women with illnesses that contradict each other, plotting how to attack a supermarket. It should be interesting! I need to find the right time of day to approach so that I won’t need to wait 20 minutes for a mobile scooter to become available! This will be the first time I’ve left the house since that April doctor visit. I can’t wait.

a rainbow at night

Update.

I’ve been feeling mostly “okay” recently, in that I can now function throughout the day. In fact I was even wondering whether it’d be time to increase my antibiotics… And then this week happened.

This week has been exhausting. My menstrual cycle found its way back to me on the 11th, so. The weakness has been terrible, I’ve been half-asleep most of the time, and my air hunger has returned (in that I constantly need to yawn). My appetite is also quite poor.

Yesterday was really bad. The night of the 13th I got a severe headache (Lortab needed) and then the following day (yesterday/14th) I woke up angry at the world and came very close to needing oxygen again… I mean, no doubt I should have used it, but it was just so depressing to think of needing it after a month and a half of NOT needing it! I pulled through, obviously, but could have come out of it a bit quicker had I just grabbed the O2. Sigh. Oh well. That’s my stubborness, and as of last night I was feeling much better.

Bartonella flares appear to be happening as follows:
~ April 3rd
~ April 8th (bad day)
~ April 14th (bad day)

Last night I drunk an Ensure… I wasn’t thinking and had the entire drink. So what happened that night here happened again. Trouble breathing, numb tongue and throat, limbs tingling, numbness in right arm. It was even more startling when I wanted to inhale but my body wasn’t doing it…! But I knew the dysautonomia was causing it, so I didn’t spaz. I’ve been drinking two bottles of Ensure a day, in 4-ounce doses to not overload my digestive system, which I should have done last night, but forgot. :\

So I think I should still be on this small doses. The herxing just hasn’t been as bad, which is good, but.. as long as I’m still herxing a little, right? I still flail and have bursts of strange thoughts after the Rifampin. And after the Zithro, my gosh…! I am so dizzy. In fact I need to mention that I’ve been dizzy for the past three weeks. I may even need to be keeping track of it, more. It gets so bad sometimes my eyes cross and I can’t focus.

In general, I am in and out of the wheelchair. I can usually walk to get something, but cannot stand in one place, even for a few seconds. In the evenings and night, I am always better, but this is nothing new. Waiting for my appetite to return… STILL NO CARDIAC SYMPTOMS!!! This is so significant and amazing! :D And my eyes have stopped twitching… :)

a rainbow at night

Slowly but surely…

…I think the pieces are coming together. I had several “episodes” since I last posted, and.. let’s be clear, that by “episodes,” I mean the thing that happens when my face and tongue go numb, my arms (or arm) goes numb, I shake and temporarily cannot swallow, which may or may not be precipitated by an urge to urinate. I’ve had lots of different types of numbness over the past several weeks, so I felt a need to clarify.

I eliminated several other things that had any timing whatsoever to do with these attacks and/or my Migraines.

  • Ensure
  • BOOST High Protein shakes
  • things with Vinegar
  • things with nitrates
  • caffeine
  • black tea (even decaf)
  • coffee (even decaf)
  • Truvia
  • Splenda,
  • and Aspartame (which is the devil anyway).

Because anything and everything can give me a Migraine attack these days. I had something marinated in apple cider vinegar and my body had a general meltdown. I had green olives with half a protein shake and had another “episode” almost immediately, so I can’t tell which was the culprit. But, having done all this, I actually haven’t had a Migraine in two days. I can’t believe that’s an accomplishment, but… I’ve been getting them every day, otherwise. I even left the house yesterday, and didn’t get one! And in the mornings, I don’t have much numbness in my arms and face, but I can’t yet determine if it’s the absence of Truvia or just a well-timed symptom. I’m scared to find out the hard way, right now. The general battle is finding out what cluster of symptoms is the bartonella, what cluster has to do with my Migraines, and how do we prevent them both. One interesting thing though: It happened this morning, and I hadn’t any Truvia, or any.. anything! Which means it can’t be purely the Truvia, despite me having a decrease in overall numbness since ceasing it. (And there’s the kicker. None of this is purely anything, but it seems to be a lot of stuff happening wrong at the right time. Which is another characteristic of my Migraines: They don’t happen until a lot of triggers add up, and then just one more will push it over the edge.) Now, what affects me worse in the mornings? Bartonella. So, which is it? My conundrum should be apparent.

My LLMD put me back on Rifampin as of the 17th since I didn’t have anything crazy happen after a month and a half on it. Then, instead of adding Doxycycline, which is driving me out of my mind with its effects and herxing and messing with my throat/vague nerve, we’re adding the Zithro! I’m pleased to report I can handle all temperatures of food and drink and have no trouble with food texture. :D I’m on just 250mg, but considering this lowest dose still makes me feel like I have the flu every evening, I’m glad we’re starting so small. I’m still on a normal dosage of Rifampin and therefore we’re killing the bartonella at a reliable level, so that’s great news for me. I will still improve at a fairly decent rate, and can expect a change in ability levels within just a few months. I’m also lucky to not have developed any reaction to Rifampin, which can happen when you stop and have to start it again. It’s apparently still working as well, because the bartonella flare I had after I restarted it (which happened to be the next day) was insane. As in, curled up in a fetal position in a dark corner of my room, sobbing hysterically, not knowing what’s going on, or even how I got there, insane. So… We definitely have to kill them bugs. Kill them dead. (This goes in the category of “things I’d never admit did I not know they happened to most people with chronic bartonella.”)

The Topamax is amazing and I’m at the full 25mg right now. My Migraines… Well, I’ve had them a long time. So I can identify when they’re coming on, but lately they have been so complex, it’s ridiculous. Usually, my migraines affect the right side of my face, with numbness and pain and temporary facial unresponsiveness; my speech slurs and I cannot tolerate any sound or light. Bartonella attacks the right side of my face too, though. :\ This recent development where my arm goes numb and my tongue goes numb? It’s anyone guess whether that’s part of a Migraine or part of a bartonella flare or herx. (It’s sometimes accompanied by this “zap” sensation as well, which I’ve never felt as part of any Migraine.) But after searching LymeNet I found out that other people with bartonella are experiencing numb tongue accompanied by numb arms. How strange is that?! One thread even talked about the general numbness that’s been creeping up on me since I started the Rifampin! And on that note, twice after taking Rifampin this time around, I couldn’t feel my legs, and all of my limbs generally have that “fallen alseep” feeling at various parts of the day now. Especially at night, when I wake up and notice my limbs are cold and numb. (That’s a bit scary, but as long as the sensation returns, I can deal with it.) So! The mystery of the random arm numbness and terrible headaches that often precipitated them, may be solved! My severely increased Migraines may just be an unfortunate consequence of treating bartonella. What also falls into place, if this is true, is why all all of this gradually got worse throughout treatment, until I got on the Doxy and all hell broke loose. Hopefully being on Azithromycin will prevent such a severe cumulation of symptoms.

In general, the “episodes” and my migraines are getting less severe and less frequent. I still have trouble when I eat sometimes, however. (Things that HAVEN’T been happening, barely at all? No dystonia, no air hunger, and no troubles with low oxygen.) I will be sticking to this “Migraine diet” until I feel safe enough to come off of it. The Ensure drinks are once again off-limits, but that’s okay because my appetite is very healthy and I’m not losing weight! I’ve been gradually adding back my supplements and herbs as well, and I’m able to tolerate them again. I’ve actually been walking around more in the past few days than I have.. possibly since January, which is amazing. As long as I don’t overdo it, I think I’m finally at a stable point again. I’m not tired, so I’m having to force myself to rest and not do more than is necessary, which is.. well, it’s annoying. It’s like sitting a healthy person in front of an amusement park with unlimited tickets and telling them they can’t get up. :| But if I’m good now, in the future I shall be able to be active without dire consequences, so I must be patient. God’s given me the best opportunity for having rest, so I need to take advantage of it. On the scale right now I’d say I’m at, 20% physical, 30% cognitive, and still 7% symptom severity. The symptoms are definitely the worst part of this right now. They are still terrible and flare so easily. But I do have a lot more cognitive functioning so I can at least use my brain more. :)

Ah, and I saw my primary physician. I had to update her on everything that’s happened during the past three months. She says not to be too worried with the brain lesion unless it changes…which is good advice, right? It’s there, it’s done; it’s if it changes that will be cause for concern. She also wants me to see another cardiologist in case something else is contributing to the mitral regurgitation. Which is, again, sound advice. Just because I have things that affect my heart doesn’t mean nothing else can be going on. So for peace of mind, my mother is taking me to one Tuesday to get a bunch of tests run, just to make sure there’s nothing there we can potentially fix.

I’ve had the same doctor for ten years. She’s seen me from the moment I started going downhill, and through the M.E., and through the remission, and then through the relapse and these infections… So her advice means more to me than any other doctor. She briefly mentioned to me something that.. sort of startled me, in a strange way. She said something to the effect of, I know you’re at a race against time to treat these infections, but you know, even in cancer patients, if the chemo is going to end up killing them… Sometimes it’s wise to just let things take their course, if the treatment is going to be just as bad or worse than the disease, so I really hope you can get on something that will work, soon, because it pains me to see you continuously going downhill like this.

…Insert sad face here?

Hearing her say that just sort of drove everything home for me, I think. These past three weeks–goodness, nearly a month!–since ‘all of that’ happened, have just been one big blur and me taking it one hour to the next, to not upset the delicate balance that my body is struggling to maintain. Consciously I do realize what I’m up against, but there’s something about talking to your doctor for twenty minutes and having her sum it up all into that

It was never a surprise that things might get this bad. Even in my old journal from the past year, which I reorganized, I found where I’d written things like this:

December 5, 2009

“Two weeks ago I couldn’t make it down my hallway. Tonight I shuffled around in the yard, and made a snowman. No, I wasn’t exactly running around, but I was STANDING UP and doing so for more than two minutes…

I’m making this post now because if what I feel right now is any comparison, tomorrow is really going to suck. No one wanted to come out in the yard and make a snowman with me. They walked outside for a minute then watched from the door as I shuffled about, but… Hell, I have no idea what condition I’ll be in next time it snows, especially if that’s a year from now. I could be better, yes, I hope, but I could very well be bedbound yet again, or worse; anyone faces these risks for some reason or another, but that knowledge is always in my mind because of.. you know.”

I guess it’s sort of like when everything tumbled in July of 2010, and I ended up living with family again, barely having a spare moment to think because things had reached a new level of bad and it all happened so fast… It just happened again, I guess. And now I’m realizing it. (Granted, I’m back on my olive leaf extract, so I’m much more “aware” of everything again!) But somehow–and the media doesn’t help–you just imagine that with enough determination you won’t “let” yourself get this sick. Ahaha. Like it’s a choice…

a rainbow at night

Three ER visits, and a hospital stay: What happened.

In case anyone was wondering why I haven’t been around, it’s because I’ve been in the hospital. If you’re on my Facebook or Twitter then you already know this. I went to ER three times in less than 24 hours, so they eventually kept me. I was there from Sunday night (Feb 27th) to Friday (Mar 4th) from these “episodes” that acted like seizures, but weren’t. The antibiotics didn’t technically cause it, i.e. it wasn’t an adverse reaction, but the medicine killing the bacteria definitely woke something up, so everything entered into a sort of revolt and my body–particularly my nervous system–could not cope. I talked to my LLMD from the hospital, and he told me to stop all Rifampin and Doxy for two weeks, only using the Doxy to avoid another emergency room trip. (You cannot stop bartonella treatment “cold turkey” because THAT can land you in the hospital, as it has for me in the past.)

My body has been fighting a lot of things these past two weeks. In addition to what I already had, my labs suggested an unidentified virus lurking, for which I can do nothing right now; I’m anemic because of the infections that I can’t treat; my blood sugar has been high (because of stress reaction I think);  and I haven’t been absorbing proper nutrition OR essential vitamins, yet I’ve also been unable to handle my nutritional shakes, so it seems inevitable that I will lose more weight. When everything else went south, my liver decided it couldn’t deal with my antibiotics, either. However my body also cannot cope withOUT the antibiotics either, since bartonella comes back with a fierce vengence in a very small amount of time, so I may very likely end up in the hospital this weekend if things take a wrong turn. All I can do is pulse the Doxy on Saturday and Sunday, and hope for the best. I’ve officially run into a treatment failure, despite us being so careful to avoid it. I’ve been very, very ill and unable to handle ANY of my medicine, even my herbs. Things got.. pretty bad.

You know, I really should be more specific in my prayers. Like, instead of asking to “make it to Saturday” without an ER visit, I probably should have extended that to the whole weekend! Because leave it to me to feel in the clear on Saturday, and then end up in the hospital on Sunday!

I guess it all started Saturday evening/night, February 26th. I watched a lot of TV, including two movies without pause, which doesn’t sound like much, but for someone with M.E., watching four-five hours of straight television and actually paying attention? That’s a lot of energy. Too bad it doesn’t affect me then and there. It was fun, and worth it, but I should have rested after that. I didn’t.

So the next day a lot of bad things came together:

  1. The relapse from the previous night began hitting me.
  2. Doxycycline takes 10 days to build up to its highest levels in your nervous system, and it was day ten.
  3. I had a small argument with my mother which stressed me out further and I am not supposed to get stressed out.
  4. I overexerted further: I just wanted to lie down in the living room and watch two movies with my family… I didn’t think it’d get me as sick as it did.

So by 7pm Sunday, I was sick as a dog (why do people say that?), herxing severely, having a Migraine, and I guess my nervous system just.. had enough. I had been having severe tremors all day, but then my muscles began spasming and going numb interchangeably. I went to my mother’s room for safety. She looked at me and immediately started making a list of my current medications for the hospital staff. (Mother-premonition?) I then proceeded to have this seizure-like episode of my limbs going numb, my tongue going numb, an inability to swallow (though I could breathe all right), and uncontrollable convulsions. My stomach felt this “rising” sensation and my speech was slurred whenever I did try to talk. This happened three times between Sunday night and Monday evening, so by the third ambulance trip, and me failing the Pronator Drift test (a neuro test, indicating a upper motor neuron lesion) they kept me.

“It” proceeded to happen again that night, twice on Tuesday, and once on Wednesday. I was discharged from the hospital Friday morning (4th) and I had a minor attack that evening. Then another minor attack on Monday, and one on Tuesday (the 8th). They were getting less severe and.. more Migraine-like than seizure-like, but then I had another bad attack two days ago on Wednesday, complete with a few minutes of convulsions. :\ But for the most part, instead of full-on convulsions I get some muscle twitching, and the “main event” is now a tingling sensation in my stomach and chest, abrupt numbness of my arms, neck, face, jaw, tongue, all mostly on the right side, and sudden slurred speech. (I still suspect some nerve around there is really messed up, perhaps that vagus nerve that has been giving me so much trouble recently.)

There are some very odd happenings that make it nearly impossible to find the true cause. I’m not sure there is just one, really. The first time it happened after drinking an Ensure; the second after taking Rifampin; the third after eating a hamburger; the fourth after eating again; the fifth after an Ensure; the sixth-thru-whatever numbers were correlated with either Ensure drinks or Migraines. In fact I’ve had a Migraine on.. Sunday (Feb 27th), Tuesday, Thursday, Tuesday (Mar 8th), and yesterday. Also, during the first three episodes, I really, really had to pee before it happened. Like, an abnormal amount, but I wasn’t drinking that much, so it didn’t make any sense. Nothing makes any sense, besides my nervous system just went into some type of overload/failure. I’m sure the exertion worsened it, as did the antibiotics/herxing, and for a time I developed the same sensitivity to Ensure as I have to daily multivitamins. I cannot take vitamins because they cause this unusual, terrible reaction where I become in a paralytic-like state for about 8 hours. And because of the number of times this happened shortly after drinking an Ensure–even though I’ve been drinking them for weeks and it helped me stop losing weight–it looks like I’m having a similar reaction to the nutrition in them, after a certain point. But why it happened after I ate? I have no idea. And why did I have to pee so badly before them? What the hell?

I’ve had intermittent arm numbness since I started antibiotics, which I’ve mentioned on here repeatedly. (And oddly enough, it was in conjuction or following severe headaches, remember? They didn’t seem like Migraines at the time, but now, I wonder…) So the antibiotics woke something up, I guess. And I also mentioned here, I’ve had increasing trouble swallowing for the past four weeks, which made it impossible to eat a lot of things. It cumulated into a full inability to initiate swallowing last Tuesday, and it was pretty scary for a while. I didn’t want to end up with a feeding tube. :( Other things of possible note are my more frequent arrhythmias and tachycardia, which annoyingly never happened during any of the three times they checked my heart rhythms! But they did run a LOT of tests of me, over twenty-five. Included was an EEG, and the results would insinuate I’m not having seizures, but the sad part is, you can still have seizures and have a normal test result. :\ So. Yeah. They ultimately found:

  • I have a rotated kidney! This has been present since birth and poses me no problem.
  • I now have moderate mitral regurgitation in my heart.
  • A spot on my brain, which made me very, very angry.

Because I’ve had three MRIs in the past two years. Three MRIs. I’ve had this lesion in my brain during the last THREE scans of my brain, and no one said anything about it! It wasn’t on my 2003 MRI, but it’s been there since at least 2009, and has gotten “minimally more prominent.” I got Lyme in 2006, and both Bartonella and Mycoplasma in 2008 (when my neuro symptoms really took off) so my best assumption is, they did it.

But speaking of brains, they had me see a shrink to make sure I wasn’t just causing these problems out of anxiety. And I can’t really blame them–my doctor mainly wanted to make sure anxiety wasn’t worsening my problems–because truly my symptoms were very anxiety-like; if I didn’t know me, I would have made the same assumption. But as you can imagine, the results of that were, “She’s sane,” which is the SECOND time I’ve had to see a psychologist to prove to my doctors I’m not just a stressed out female… So maybe now they’ll leave that alone?! An interesting fact, though: The psychologist knew what Rifampin was because he has two other patients who have been off and on antibiotics for Lyme and coinfections. You know, in this state where I live, where Lyme supposedly doesn’t exist? Just like the two patients my infectious disease doctor treated here? Yeah…

The area of my brain with the lesion is the Pons, which is part of the Brain Stem. All of your brain is important but that.. is.. very important. It’s the part that allows communication between the your brain and spinal cord, i.e., any signal your body gets or receives has to pass through it. Wiki says the Pons is about 2.5cm in length, so the fact that this “spot” I have is 1cm itself… A little frightening, that. It could have been caused by a particularly bad Migraine, but.. then why is it getting any bigger at all? Or if it’s demyelination caused by an infection, it’ll just be there forever. If it’s actually a Lyme cyst, it could disappear with antibiotic treatment, because it’s not nerve damage as much as it is a bundle of bacteria that appears as a lesion on an MRI. The worse case scenario is that these infections have triggered multiple sclerosis (MS), which Lyme, Bartonella, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are all capable of doing. And truth be told, the spot is more MS-like than Lyme-like. But. That scenario seems less likely, because MS doesn’t improve on antibiotics; I did.

As for the valve regurgitation… Well, I guess I expected as much. MVR generally gets worse over time, so it’s a little scary that it went from mild to moderate in just a year and a half, but… I guess when you look at what’s currently happening, and also with me being unable to treat the bartonella for almost a year (bartonella really likes the heart), it’s not that shocking. As if having M.E. wasn’t enough of a predisposition to heart failure, this does not help.

I’ve been working on this entry since Tuesday, so maybe in another few days (hopefully sooner!) I’ll try to make a post about what’s happening now. Until then, wish me luck with my antibiotic pulse, that it’s enough to keep me from the ER! I’m sure they’re very sick of me by now!

a rainbow at night

[Note, Nov 17, 2011: Further developments as to what happened can be found in subsequent posts, or by clicking the "pings" (posts where I referenced this one) below. These attacks were eventually proven to be neuropathy of my vagus nerve.]

Symptom recap, middle of Lyme week.

Let’s see. What do I need to update about… Ah, who am I kidding, this is going to be one big ramble!

I’ve been re-tagging my primary blog, the one that used to serve as my health diary until I decided to switch all those things to here and make it public instead of invite-only. That old one is still so useful to me. What’s even more useful are my daily symptom charts… But they are so taxing to fill out, I stopped doing them out after just one week on antibiotics. I used to be able to, but this time around it’s just impossible to keep up.

My intestines are no longer giving me any problem, so whatever was happening has resolved itself. I’m having daily air hunger ever since my Lyme flare started, and in fact, after skimming through my entire prior blog the past two weeks, I’ve realized my air hunger nearly always coincides with my Lyme flares (that may or may not be distinguishable from the mycoplasma pneumonia; I have yet to figure out if that infection has a pattern or not). Nonetheless I am in my typical Lyme week, and having air hunger. I am slighlty comforted by this, because it makes it less likely that this is happening because of babesiosis, something that I don’t think I have but won’t really know until we get rid of these other things. Also, I’ve realized repeatedly that oxygen does not help air hunger. It only makes it slightly less severe, but unlike for normal shortness/gasping of breath, it doesn’t truly relieve it. There must be some neurological component to it, I think, because my vagus nerve is also experiencing problems for the past several days. This happened in responsed to treatment last time as well.

For some reason Lyme disease have an affinity for the facial nerves (most commonly presented as bell’s palsy), I suspect because they are the closest connection to the brain, where the bacteria primarily reside. Except for the vagus nerve, that is, which not only goes from the brain to the face, but all the way to.. your stomach, I believe? It controls things such as heart rate, blood pressure, and gag reflex, and reacts to temperature changes. (Recall the term “vasovagal syncope”?) The last time I was in treatment I became unable to drink anything cold for three months–even water had to be heated to room temperature! And I was consistently nauseated for a very long time, which was only alleviated by an anticholinergic that happened to be used to treat a hyper vagus nerve. So now, something of that sort is happening again, and I’m unable to swallow a lot of my pills. There is a lot of synchrony involved in swallowing, and things just aren’t lining up. Either I just can’t initate the action, or I do manage to swallow but my throat spasms halfway through, or I for SOME reason try to BREATHE in the middle of it, which has forced me to hold my nose so that I don’t sporadically inhale! ‘Tis not been pleasant, to say the least.

My temperature made a spike to 99.6 on Thursday when I began taking my antibiotics at regular intervals (Rifampin 300mg + Doxycycline 100mg, both twice a day), and after that,  it went down to 98.9…where it has stayed ever since. Every now and again it’ll go to 99.2, and then drop back down to 98.9. Then maybe another slight jump, and back down. But it basically hasn’t changed: Before I go to bed it’s 98.9, when I wake up it’s 98.9, when I take it at random intervals, it’s 98.9. I’ve tried two thermometer and even asked my mother to be a control subject (98.2 for her), so it’s definitely something within me. It can’t be my menses because you still experience a normal temperature fluctuation, just with a higher baseline. I.. have no fluctuation, except for small spike after I take my antibiotics! But I’m almost a little glad about this because when your temperature lowers is when the bacteria can most-easily replicate. Maybe now that I’m on Doxycycline, whose (haha I speak as if it’s a person) entire purpose is to stop bacteria from replicating… Yeah.

I found out Rifampin can lower your Vitamin D levels, so I’m glad I take extra Vitamin D every day anyway. :|

…OH. Another thing bothering me more and more is food texture. Right now my diet subsists almost entirely of whole grains, raw fruit and vegetables, eggs, and Ensure drinks. Occasionally I eat chicken.

All things considered I think I’m dealing pretty well being on both antibiotics… Ah, well, of course I have excruitating headaches come nightfall (Lortab-requiring) but that’s a given. Headaches are my most prominent infection symptom and my most prominent herx reaction. I’m not having as much blatant dystonia lately as I am more parkinsonism symptoms. (I qualify so closely for a diagnosis of a “dystonia plus syndrome” I’ve actually considered getting evaluated by a movement disorder specialist to see if I’m showing signs of anything genetic; my dystonia first appeared in my left foot about four or five years ago.) But yes, recently there is more trouble with tremors, difficult initating and stopping movement, freezing movements, slow movements. Again, my facial spasms have died down. I still have the head shaking, but not as severe. I’m currently trying to determine whether it’s my neck or if I’m having nystagmus, which is where your eyes move and your head shakes to compensate. I know my left eye dances and has a mind of its own, especially during Lyme flares… So that may be it. Whatever the origin, it’s not as severe. My feet are beginning to hurt again… Is it time for a bartonella flare soon?

Speaking of which, I’m concerned for the end of this month again. Maybe not this next one, but the one after it, the dreaded “bartonella flare after the Lyme flare” that’s been repeatedly responsible for trying to hospitalize me. I’m only concerned because the chance of it happening becomes more frequent when I have stabbing lung pains (I’ve had pleurisy twice in the past eight months) and air hunger in the week prior… Both of which I’ve had this week. I’ve previously speculated that the mycoplasma might have something to do with it, too, since this happens every other month and mycoplasma replicate very slowly… But we’ll see. I haven’t been coughing yet–… Oh, wait. Yes, I have been, a lot… Ah, crap. :|

Well, hoping this is all just herxing and nothing akin to an ominous sign…! (If I start having random allergies and chest pain, then I’ll begin to worry.)

Oh, but speaking of headaches (which was a couple of paragraphs ago I think), since I’ve needed Lortabs nightly and had no arm numbness, I think that kills the medication-reaction theory about my arms randomly going numb.

My legs have been weak, but again, Lyme, so there’s nothing too unusual there; just need to mention it. I’m having arrhythmias as well but after repeatedly mentioning it during Lyme flares, I think it’s the cause of those, too…

And this concludes my recap of the symptoms I’m currently experiencing. :)

a rainbow at night

A milder flare… At least, relatively so.

Today has been.. strange. Last night after the Doxy (and something that’s happened the past two nights, actually), I’ve gotten a neck ache and racing thoughts, most of them being paranoid or depressive thoughts. I know it’s because of the antibiotic, for example, before I took it last night I was thinking of how blessed I was to have so many people who care about me and offer their support… And then two hours after the Doxy I was an emotional wreck. I’m glad I’m able to sleep through it… At least until I start the twice-a-day 100mg on Thursday.

When I woke up, I was in a lot of pain (in the neck! haha), so a Fioricet was taken. It has caffeine in it, and so I used that to take a bath before taking my Rifampin at noon. It feels wonderful to be clean, and to have done it myself! A couple of hours later my oxygen became necessary. I got off of it about an hour and a half later, but when I wheeled to the kitchen to fetch myself a bottle of water, by the time I got back I became severely and suddenly exanimate. Like a FOOL I lied in bed for five minutes before realizing that wasn’t going to work, so I plugged in (oxygen) again. I was able to breathe again within minutes. Mum said my color had finally returned, so for another hour and a half I “oxygenated” and had a nice relaxing time… Or at least, I think it was relaxing.

I entered into this mental state of being very aware of my body’s condition, and those are honestly the only words I can think to describe it. I was comfortable, which was nice, and I could breathe, which was very nice, but I was also aware of every pain that entered my body, and every minor twitch. For instance, my shins are hurting today. I feel that I was borderline dissociative, because that type of sudden altered mental status isn’t normal. But again, today there was the strong possibility of a bartonella flare up, and it seems that it did happen, if my need of oxygen and volatile moods (from happy to angry to paranoid, to happy, to…you get the idea) are anything to judge by. I can usually tell the day is going to be “interesting” if I start thinking angry and resentful thoughts first thing upon awakening. That’s so unlike me, in every way, and I immediatley think, “Wow, what is wrong with me?!”

I got a migraine yesterday, but forgot to mention. It was the first I’ve had in a couple of weeks, I think…! Also yesterday evening, I had a temperate of 99.5, but I’m pretty sure that was only due to it being very warm. We had to turn on the air conditioning because I was about to pass out, being unable to handle heat at all. I’m a little depressed that winter is about to end; I hate Spring and Summer with a passion. My Lyme flare should be approaching soon… Not looking forward to that, but hey, I’ll be on Doxy this time so it will help STOP those bacteria that try to reproduce! And that makes me happy. :D

And another bit of good news: The Ensure Clinical shakes I decided to start drinking have helped me to stop losing weight! I haven’t gained any back, but I haven’t lost another two pounds, which is what would have happened, so I’m quite thrilled, really! So if anyone is losing weight because of infectious disease, I would highly recommend them. I’m sending a friend some of thes extra coupons I have (buy 2 get 1 free), so hopefully they will stop losing as well!

I’ll leave you with a picture of my view this evening, as the sun set outside my window. This is the time of day I used to sit on my porch with evening coffee, watch the birds fly home and listen to the bats chirp.

a rainbow at night

A “what do you eat when you’re sick” update.

So. Here’s la deuxième partie of the “What do you eat when you’re sick?” dilemma. After some thinking, praying, and random internet searches, I remembered something my mother had told me. She said my sister’s doctor had put her on Ensure to help her maintain weight when she was sick from the multiple sclerosis. Well, I tried Ensure in the past and found it to be.. unpleasant. And that’s how I ended up on BOOST drinks, instead. They taste something like liquid ice cream, while regular Ensure tastes very.. thick?.. and just generally unpleasant. When I had to start avoiding sugar even more because of being on longterm antibiotics, I switched to the Glucose Control (GC) variety, which only has 6 grams of sugar in comparison to the 25 grams that’s in the High Protein (HP) kind; the GC actually has more protein than the HP, even! So there wasn’t any downfall to the change… Until now, that is.

It was never a problem that the BOOST GC shakes had  “only” 190 calories, since they were more for nutrition and supplemental protein purposes than they were to maintain weight. (For some unexplained reason I experience a sensitivity-reaction to taking a daily multi-vitamin, so that was never an option.) Now that I need something more tailored to the current situation, I re-researched Ensure, and I found…

Ensure Clinical!

This variety is specifically designed to help you maintain or gain weight, with a lovely 350 calories! It also has.. ah, let me just list it:

  • 13 grams of protein (26% recommended daily intake/RDI)
  • 910mg of potassium! (That’s 26% of your RDI and will help me so much with my dehydration issues)
  • Added amino acids to help rebuild lost muscle mass (Yes, please)
  • 24 essential vitamins and minerals
  • Prebiotic fiber (12% RDI) to help promote digestive tract health
  • Antioxidants (Vitamin C, E, and Selenium) for immune system support

It does has 22 grams of sugar, which means I’ll have to watch out for any unnecessary sugar intake that I might have been allowed before. Say, maybe eat more fruit that is less-sweet, and/or eat less of the more-sweet fruit (pineapple, for example). That’s do-able. It’s also gluten free, and suitable for lactose intolerance! I don’t have either of those, but just in case anyone else was interested.

Did you know you can go on eBay and buy coupons? And no, it’s not a scam; they actually work. I’ve been doing that lately for the more expensive things, like the BOOST drinks which are about $9 per 6-pack. That adds up when you go through at least four packs per month. The Ensure Clinical shakes are around $8 per 4-pack, so when I found coupons for Buy Two Get One Free (on any 4-pack), I snagged them. Also, their website has a $3-off coupon, which I’m about to print as soon as I can sit up and roll over to my printer. :)

So. Hopefully this will be a temporary solution to the problem at hand, because goodness knows with all I have going on, the last thing my family or myself needs to worry about is continuous, invountarily weightloss. They may not taste like liquid ice cream but I really can’t afford to be that picky right now!

a rainbow at night