MTHFR Deficiency Cannot Be Cured, But Treating To Cure is All I’ve Ever Done

Earlier this month I found out I had another new diagnosis, another piece to my chronic illness puzzle.

I found a doctor with experience in the area, and spent three weeks gathering the past 18 months of my medical records and filling out their extensive forms.

And this afternoon, I shredded all of it.

I found out I do, indeed, have the MTHFR gene mutation genetic polymorphism. Two of them, two copies of the C677T mutation, or MTHFR 677 TT, put another way (homozygous). This is not the worst case scenario, which would be one C677T and one A1298C polymorphism. What it does mean–as far as I can tell–is that while people with only one copy of the C677T polymorphism might have mild problems or generally do just fine, people with two copies are at a higher risk for the associated diseases. And it’s a reason why I cannot detox properly. Maybe the reason.

At the biological level, it means my body has trouble converting folic acid–the synthetic, unnatural, manmade form of Folate/B9–into a form that I can use. And because properly converting folic acid is what allows you to properly convert B12 to use, I have trouble there, too. (Or at least, I’m supposed to…?) So because these polymorphisms cause my body to be less efficient, I don’t make enough methylfolate. But you need methylfolate to use folic acid, and you also need methylfolate to use B12 (that is, to convert the common manmade-B12, cyanocobalamin, into the body’s natural, useable-B12, methylcobalamin).

Depending upon how much you randomly know, you may have noticed that says I cannot convert the forms of Folate and B12 that are added to everything, including 99% of vitamin supplements: Folic acid and Cyanocobalamin. They’re in everything because people are supposed to be able to convert them and use them. But I can’t do that very well, so if I consume things that have these, such as in vitamins or enriched foods, I am going to have a build-up of these unusable-to-me forms of vitamins, while never getting adequate amounts of the ones I can use.

This is why taking a multivitamin makes me sick. Even when I was taking my B-complex, I always had to chop them into pieces and only take them a few times per week to avoid sickness. Now, FINALLY, I know why this happens!!

“Folic Acid is Not Methylfolate

“Synthetic folic acid does not exist in the human body. It is found in vitamins, and thanks to the FDA’s wisdom, in enriched flour-based foods (yet another reason to shun flour!).  Multiple enzymatic steps are necessary to convert folic acid into its active form beginning with dihydrofolate reductase in the gut.  Individuals with gene variants, but specifically homozygous C677 should avoid folic acid because of the concern for limited breakdown and subsequent accumulation of this man-made agent. One study has implicated folic acid in suppression of important immune factors called natural killer cells.

Source: Kelly Brogan, MD

All of this is supposed to mean I should have elevated levels of some things and low levels of various other things floating around because I can’t convert them properly… And these excess levels can cause all sorts of problems. But, according to my recent bloodwork–particularly the homocysteine–everything is within normal limits. It’s kind of astonishing, really.

To say I’m appreciative of my body finding ways around this, and making me crave food that would give me what I need, is an understatement. Go body, go! I will help you.

You know what medication makes this worse? Bactrim. This probably helps explain why my liver was fine until I needed Bactrim to finish killing off the bartonella infection. Should I need it again in the future, I will know to take milk thistle or something similar, to offset the effects, BEFORE my body gets too stressed…

And that’s pretty much how I’m going to approach this entire thing. I’m going to learn about it slowly and do what I can do offset the effects–symptom management, palliative care–and let my body continue doing what it can for as long as it can. I may do further research into mild supplementation, but mainly, my outlook is that this is another quirk I get the OPPORTUNITY to manage. Of course I reserve the right to change my mind at any time, but:

I am not going to go into “treatment mode.”

And it took several weeks of lamentation for me to really understand I had that choice, and that it wouldn’t be the same as suicide. As one person put it,

“The media constantly bangs on about how to live. . . They tell you how to preserve your body surgically and chemically so you look younger, slimmer, healthier. Why? Nature is perfect in herself. Every season is beautiful.

To be suicidal is to want to die and take actions to facilitate it. But I want to live. It just so happens that humans are subject to disease and death, and if I continue on the path which I have for the past almost-thirteen years, I will not be able to enjoy my life, the only one I have.

I am going through a whirlwind of emotions with this, and if you think you’re able, you can take the ride with me.

I don’t think I’ve ever been so scared, or happy, in my entire life. To be continued

a rainbow at night

PostScript: I’ve been doing a lot of photography lately in honour of Jeremiah Katches‘ passing, so I’ll be posting some of my pictures at the bottom of my posts. This may be a temporary thing or ongoing (much like life, really), but here you go:

Letting Go of Society’s Expectations (…and Bartonella)

Despite the fact that my brain has been functioning a lot better recently, I haven’t much felt like updating; completely the opposite of several weeks back, when I couldn’t think to save my soul but desperately had things to say! I’m learning a new language, so most of my spare brain energy has been going into that. This minor study will also help me decide if I may be able to attempt finishing my degree come next August. If I cannot, however, I think I’d be okay with just letting it go. After all, I do have at least one degree–even if it’s not what I set out for–and my health is too precious to waste on going to university to finish a degree I may never be able to use, and which may worsen me irreversibly trying to obtain.

I have fought too hard to get to this point, and I don’t want what society says I should be doing to dictate what would actually be best for me. I reject the idea that my only purpose in getting well should be to immediately resume the life I once had, or try to get it as close as possible. If I do reach the point where I am finally stable, I would love to try and finish and become a researcher. Or at the very least, a counselor. But that would take a lot of trust in the fact that I’d still be stable and healthy enough to actually do those things after completing my degree. One of the main reasons I’m disabled is that my symptoms vary so dramatically: I cannot reliably plan even a week in advance, much less years. So if I never again become well enough and well long enough for that, wouldn’t it be better to attempt some type of small job with the degree I already have, than to use up every bit of health I’ve finally gained, in pursuit of something that won’t do me any good? And even doing that would require much more health than just enough to make sure I don’t starve on my own, which at this point is all I can realistically expect, if anything. If I only ever improve enough to take care of my basic needs, I will be thankful.

Illness has taught me my worth is not defined by what I can do, how much money I make, what level of degree I have, or what job I have, if any, if ever. I am worthy because I am here, because I exist.

Okay, let’s see. From the 16th-23rd I was having a typical Lyme flare… How is it possible that this pattern hasn’t changed, practically since the time I got it? Is it really THAT predictable? But yes, severe headache and neuropathy issues, and I also recall being more cognitively impaired during then, as well as thirsty–again, all typical.

I felt it’d be okay to restart my stretching routine a couple weeks ago, so every other day I get some “exercise”! No relapse, yet. I’ve been able to cook a lot lately, also, which is encouraging. It’s still difficult and frustrating because my muscles fail the day after using them, but hopefully that will improve more, soon. If the muscle weakness got worse when I got these infections, surely it will improve as I continue to treat them.

Dare I say that the bartonella eradication is going as planned? The Bactrim is amazing, and I think the bartonella is.. well, it might be gone, or at least, finally beat into submission?! The protocol is to continue treatment two months past the cessation of symptoms. I talk to my Lyme specialist next month, so we’ll see what he says! Then I can start Tindamax to finally treat the Lyme disease! The antibiotics I’m on now do treat it, but only minimally: just enough to keep it from taking over. I’ll be stopping the Rifampin since I can’t take it with Tindamax, but I may stay on a maintenance dose of the Bactrim since bartonella has a crazy-high rate of relapse, and I do not want to go through this again. I feel I’m probably being unrealistic that I should never face it again, with the way my immune system is, but… For now I’d really like to enjoy my improvement.


Til next time,

a rainbow at night

Joint pain!!!

Wow! So I started getting joint pain about two days ago, I think. At first it was very mild, then yesterday it kicked it up a notch.

When I first started Doxy in 2009, I had a severe bout of joint pain that lasted two days, and I think the same thing happend with Rifampin, so I’m HOPING this is just a herx reaction from the Bactrim and not the Lyme trying to invade my joints while it has the chance. It did this a few random night while at the hotel, as well, now that I recall…

It feels exactly–exactly–like when I was in university, two months after sustaining the tick bite, and woke up with so much pain in my left knee I could not move it. It feels like someone is trying to snap my knees in half, and not like anything I’ve ever felt; not even the tendon pain from when I had fibromyalgia equates to this. Last night it was both knees, and my right elbow. I thought I might start hyperventilating from the pain when I (perhaps stupidly) tried to roll over…! Oh my goodness!

When I awoke this morning, it was completely gone. Or at least I thought it was… Yesterday I awoke with knee pain and elbow pain, then today, upon moving around, found out it just traveled, so now it’s in my feet and my shoulders, instead. Still, it only gets to “feels like it’s breaking” level when I sleep.

I took a nap this afternoon–something that always makes me feel worse–and when I awoke, it was trying to happen again. I could feel the inflammation and warmth; I took ibuprofen and it’s tolerable, now.

Oh Lyme, you are a funny spirochete… Get out!

I never get joint pain. In having this blog for a year now, I still don’t have a tag for it! Now I do.

I have the deepest sympathy for those who deal with this symptom every day–I think I’d rather have one of my killer headaches!

ETA: I just had to come back and add this tidbit from’s Comparison Chart of Lyme Disease and Co-infections Symptoms:

“Being awakened by sudden severe arthritic pains throughout entire body that is excruciating, dramatic, and feels like you are on deaths door and most is gone by the next morning.”


a rainbow at night


I think I’ve finally hit “the moment” in my treatment.

First: Yes, I have heard the news about the Whittemore Peterson Institute, but I don’t want to dampen my good news with such a topic, though it troubles me greatly. I will say, however, that I stand by Dr. Mikovits and anxiously await her new endeavors.

Secondly, it’s so.. conflicting, for me to write of my own good news in the wake of so many myalgic encephalomyelitis deaths. We’ve had five in just over a month? Maybe it’s the result of me being more in the community that I hear about it more? I’m not sure. :( But the death rate of 1 in 20 is beginning to sound like a myth, at this point.

Such is the reason why we cannot afford these petty arguments amongst the best researchers and institutions that we have on our side.

But my main reason to write is that…


I expected things to have a good spell and then back down, as is common for us “Lymies,” but nope! The Bactrim is treating me very well. I suspected it might, because it’s in the sulfa class and I respond well to those, for whatever reason, but this is truly remarkable. He wanted me on Bactrim DS (double strength), but as is usual for me, I could only tolerate the normal dose; taking one DS tablet put me in a state of being unable to move for four hours. Since when do antibiotic cause such drowsiness???

The herxing is mainly dizziness (which seems standard with any antibiotic I start), and I get anxiety after my night Rifampin dose like I used to a while back–it’s not severe enough to cause me to not take any of my medication, though. The seeming-optic-neuritis-thing went away after about a week, thankfully. I’ve been coughing  a lot more than usual, which is slightly troubling, and my eye twitches are happening more frequently? My mid-week flares (that are still falling from Tuesday-Thursday) are still present (headache, fatigue, dizziness, blood pressure problems, shin pain, mild fever) but not as severe, either! I had a light dotted rash on my feet the other day, but it was very faint. And the cardiac complications I’ve mentioned in previous posts, are now gone! Was it just a herx from whatever bacteria had caused it to worsen? Whatever it was, it seems I’ve recovered from it, but I see my cardiologist on Friday for my echo, and on Thursday I get my bloodwork done to check my immune system, kidney, and liver function.


I’m definitely not getting worse, so I’m inclined to believe the antibiotics have been/are fighting whatever new infection I got from those new fleas! Yay!

The other day I went to Walmart, with no sunglasses, and no earplugs, and I walked on my own, with no cane nor wheelchair nor mobility scooter to help me. All right, I leaned on the shopping cart, but who doesn’t? It was a huge moment, and it shows me where I will be headed once we kill the rest of these critters. I haven’t been able to stand up and shop for myself in over a year… And there I was, walking and standing in a supermarket for twenty minutes! That is huge!

Generally speaking (evening out the good days with bad days), if I were to rank myself on the ability scale now, I would say I am at 40% physical ability, 45% cognitive ability, and 50% symptom severity. Since my last checkpoint in May, that’s twice as good physically, 10% better cognitively, and 22% better symptom-wise! Also, if you look at the list I made then, I’ve gotten goals 1 and 2 out of the way, I’m working on doing 3 right now, and hopefully will be getting to 4-5 soon!

I’ll probably post next with my lab and echo results, etc., and who knows, maybe even more good news. To my dear readers, remember to be gentle with yourself; your body is doing the very best job it knows how.

a rainbow at night

Is this some form of optic neuritis? Also, lots of improvements!

My eyes hurt. My eyes hurt a lot, behind the sockets, but mostly when I move them… Well, try to move them, because I really can’t due to the pain, and specifically, it’s just my right eye. I’m also terribly photosensitive but that should be a given, right? (Sunglasses are your friend. So is the screen brightness adjustor on your computer.) I haven’t had this happened in months; it used to occur minorly as a bartonella symptom. But I don’t know WHAT this is, because it’s never been this severe nor lasted as long. It only responds to high doses of ibuprofen–not even entire Vicodin pills (I only ever need half at a time) give me any relief. This is the third day of it, and it’s starting to finally ease up. Yesterday the front of my skull also hurt, and now I have some type of headache in my neck, but that might be unrelated since the middle of the week is approaching (middle-week blues!). I’m very glad to be switching antibiotics!

I don’t get to say this often, so let me mention: Besides the at-times-excruciating eye pain, I have felt fabulous. We are finally in our new home and instead of being housebound I have been walking unassisted and moving boxes, and.. ha! Probably overdoing it a little, but I’m willing to pay the consequences this time. The only difference is I’m only on Rifampin because I had to stop the Zithro; unfortunately you can’t just take Rifampin because it creates bacteria resistance. This has only been for two days, to let the azithromycin clear out of my system because I had to start Bactrim today, and I didn’t want them to mess with my QT interval.

After some rescheduling confusion, I spoke with my LLMD this past Wednesday. Apparently his nurses had told him my results, and sent them to me, but he never got to look at them! This happened at his first office, too, when his staff said my Mycoplasma pneumoniae was negative and it wasn’t. (He needs new nurses.) But anyway! He confirmed that my bartonella result is positive. We’re not sure about the ehrlichiosis, as far a what my results showed before I got all the new flea bites; I get the idea he’s not too used to dealing with it though he knows that fleas are a big transmitter and how to treat it. He’s not certain what’s causing my flare-up every seven days, but suspects bartonella. He also said bartonella can cause the spots on my feet (I hope “that’s all” it is), and he’s not too concerned with retesting me because of me already being on the right treatments. I’m fine with that. He was unsure of whether it was my old infection was flaring, or the result of something I caught via those new fleas, but the conversation mainly became, what can we do to kill it now that it’s showing itself?

First I was going to start Cipro. But I have at least four contraindications: severe muscle weakness similar to myasthenia gravis (and I’m not completely certain I don’t have that, not until I get tested a second time this November to be sure), CNS lesions, chronically low or borderline potassium, and arrhythmia related to QT internal. So instead, we’re putting the Lyme treatment on hold for a few months and targetting the bartonella on its own, with Bactrim, to hopefully kick it out completely. So we’re dropping the Zithro, then in addition to the Rifampin I’ll also be on Bactrim. I took my first dose tonight and I feel okay, save the normal things. I hope I don’t herx too bad! The Lyme shouldn’t have enough time (just three replication cycles) to gain any momentum before I start something to start killing that, in January. That will be one year of bartonella treatment! From there I can hopefully just be on some type of maintenance dose?

Also, a current milestone is that this is the longest consecutive time I’ve stayed out of a hospital in three years! It’s been nine months since I last went! There were some close calls, especially two months ago, but I made it through and I’m setting a new record. ;)

AND EVEN MORE GOOD NEWS. I am now almost at the healthy weight I was before these infections relapsed roughly two years ago. I have gained seven more pounds, and have three more to go! This is not only great, but security, because if I ever do end up severely ill and lose weight, it won’t automatically be dangerous.

I think if the Bactrim dosen’t herx me too severely, I should be able to drive within another month. But we’ll see. ;D

Well, that’s all for now. I’m going to the theatre tomorrow!

a rainbow at night