For right now, this needs to stop.

As far as my relapse conundrum, I could not continue treatment, after all. I just.. stopped. I am still so emotionally drained, and my body is at wits’ end. I’ve been off antibiotics for a month, now, and I’m flaring at the moment because of the usual beginning-of-the-month bug-flare that happens… Only this time I am not protected, so it’s scary to think of what they’re doing in there! How can one feel this close to having the flu and not actually have influenza?

On Samhain I ultimately decided to take another two weeks off and just restore my body as much as I can, with only the necessary things and as few medications as possible. I don’t think I have any yeast problems from the long-term antibiotics, but I’m going to take a few doses of candidiasis treatment, just in case. And then I’ll talk to my LLMD and see where we can go from here.

I can’t thank you all enough for the responses to my last post. At any given moment, I am ready to reach out for help, or curl into a ball and never speak again. It’s a constant back and forth. I want to say, “the disease is what makes me want to retreat,” but it’s not even that. It’s my response to it. It’s knowing that I do have some control here, I do have a choice, and I’m terrified of making the wrong decision. Continue this grueling treatment regimen and make myself worse, an inevitable decline, or forego treatment completely and still begin an inevitable decline. But I’ll tell you what.

My intuition says to stop.

And I always, always listen to it. It says I need this break. It says I could use it to heal my body as much as I can, and in two weeks I may know clearly again what next step to take. I can’t believe in God as much as I do, and ask Him to guide me, and then not follow what I feel is the right course of action, even though I can’t explain it.

That became even more apparent today when I really wanted to take my antibiotics again, because the thought that these infections are inside me running amuck and I have nothing to stop them, is very frightening. It was then that I noticed how strong my conviction was to not resume my treatment…

Anyone think I’m crazy, yet?

I can’t help but notice that the idea of treatment helping me, which has always been my motivator in the past, has not even crossed my mind. It’s as if somewhere inside I know that to continue with it at this point in time would do me harm. Logically speaking, I think that not treating is also pretty bad, but somehow, not as bad as taking these medications; at least not right now.

So that’s where I’m at.


I also had a visit with my new neurologist, and it wasn’t as productive as I thought it’d be. Part of that is my body’s fault because I only got to ask him half of what I wanted–I was so bad-off that morning I almost passed out in their waiting room.

In response to my relapse he said, “There will be good weeks and bad weeks, good months and bad months.” And apparently when you tell someone you have myalgic encephalomyelitis they don’t think twice about you having severe daily headaches and eye pain (i.e., “I guess you do have headaches”). But he’s a good doctor who at least didn’t outright call me a hypochondriac. I’ve noticed with having this lesion on my brain, people tend not to think you’re “just exaggerating” quite as much. He said it was post-infectious demyelination, but it wasn’t changing in size so he didn’t feel I needed a repeat MRI for right now. My various damaged nerves are healing up, so that’s a good thing! So much so, that he didn’t  think I ever had facial palsy…! Luckily that’s in my notes from my last neurologist. :\

He also thinks all my movement disorder problems are Tourette’s… Which is wildly inaccurate, but because he thinks Tourette’s Syndrome is just a “group” of movement disorders rather than its own thing, and that it should be diagnosed only after the other movement disorders have been ruled out, it would make sense for him to say that. I can always see that movement disorder specialist should things progress even further, so. (I know it’s not Tourette’s because, while my TS does act up when I get new infections, it acts up completely differently than the problems I’m currently having.)

He said do NOT take any triptans for my migraines (the main reason I went to see him, actually), and gave me Cambia powder to try for my next attack. Which my insurance won’t cover, of course, so I’ll rely on samples, like the other three medications I can’t afford. He diagnosed me with complicated migraine and said I really should be on a preventative medication with this type of diagnosis, but I mentioned that not ALL my migraines do the whole “Hey I Look Like I’m Having A Stroke” thing. I’ve had them fifteen years (or at least that’s when I was finally diagnosed), so it makes sense they’d eventually progress, but I only get “those” maybe once a month or every two months…which is probably not very good, but good lord I just can’t handle another medication right now, especially when my options for preventative medications are very limited! I think he actually ran out of ideas for me since Topamax is practically my only choice and it lowers my intracranial pressure. :\ But at least Migraine is a well-studied disease and, should I live long enough, they will probably come out with something new, soon.


The best news I have is: (1) I got to visit a friend (actually, I returned to the scene of the crime of where I caught Lyme disease), and I recovered pretty easily from it with all the careful planning and tailored resting schedules. And (2) I invested in a tilting overbed table. I don’t think I have words to describe how useful it is. How have I never thought of this before? Person who is in bed most of the time, desks that go over the bed… Regardless, this thing is amazing. What I really love is the little mini-desk on the side that always stays flat so you can put stuff on it!

a rainbow at night

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My First Real Post in Months: “Something” Has Happened

My birthday was in August and it was incredible. Full of love from friends and family and the amazing gift that I was alive to enjoy it. I thanked my Lyme doctor for helping save my life, because without his aid I know I wouldn’t have made it. The whole celebration affair took two days to get through because I didn’t want to exhaust myself–I tried!–but let’s just say, next year I shall ask for more assistance, especially in opening gifts because I did the closest thing possible to arm-murder for someone with M.E. The eustress still affected me profoundly, and the muscle relapse I experienced took me weeks to recover from. By mid-September I did finally get to a place where I was okay enough to start typing, replying to e-mails, et cetera, albeit at a much-reduced level. I think that’s when I made my last “real” entry… Anyway.

Since my last actual update I have been “officially” diagnosed with vasculitis, upped my Biaxin dose, then had to stop everything completely.

 

After a necessary car ride (read as: hurricane evacuation) put me in the sunlight for eight hours, my sporadically-present vasculitis-of-the-past-ten-years went into overdrive and has been bothering me daily, often severely, ever since. I have to avoid all sunlight and any temperature change…which I always have to do, but right now it’s even more important. I did get tests to see if anything autoimmune had been triggered, but the tests, ANA and the relatives, were all normal, so that’s good. I got the diagnosis of inflammatory vasculitis on the 6th of September, which ironically was two days after upping my Biaxin to twice daily instead of once daily, but the Biaxin was unrelated, since the problems began days earlier with all that sun exposure. My PCP told me all the weird quirks I’d been having–the INTENSE dizzy spells, the blurred vision, that the main vascular problems were in my hands and feet–were all related. She said it starts in the small blood vessels–ears, eyes, extremities–and spreads from there, and to manage it with ibuprofen, which for now, mostly works.

We want to avoid going on steroids if we can, because of how they suppress the immune system… But I’ve been off and on Nasonex (an inhaled corticosteroid for sinus inflammation; I don’t have allergies) and it’s such a catch-22. I always feel better when I’m on it, but it also messes with my immune system so that other problems act up. Sigh.

 

For the most part I had been feeling GREAT with the twice daily Biaxin, but when I’m down, I’m really down. I have no idea what to say about my general health status, otherwise. :\ I always get a bad flare at the beginning of the month because this is one of the bug cycles (I think the Mycoplasma, but maybe the Lyme–I have no idea, I just know it’s not related to my menses because that has no reliable pattern due whatsoever, and hasn’t for years). Well, this month’s flare was absolutely terrible because of being on the doubled antibiotic dosage–“herxapalooza,” as one of my friends calls it.

When I was on Zithro (biaxin’s cousin), there would be one day a month I’d have to stop my antibiotics and let the herx die down, lest I end up it the emergency room. I came very close to going this month, not because of the herx itself, but because of a Migraine that was almost completely resistant to treatment. All I had at my house was off-brand medicine and name-brand Treximet, the latter of which  I cannot take with my type of migraine (which I DID NOT KNOW–need to discuss this with my new neuro!). So it was bad. Bad bad. The aura began with an awful prodrome of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome on Friday (Sept 28th) and the Migraine began two days later on Sunday (Sept 30th). Another two days later it was gone, but I have been sicker than sick ever since.

I have stopped ALL of my antibiotics in an attempt to recover, and I’m planning to resume them Monday if I’m able. If not, I’ll give it another week like I sometimes have to do. It’s been four straight months since having to take any kind of break, so that’s good. I hope it’s just the herxing (my liver is fine, by the way!), because this is a little frightening.

I haven’t needed my wheelchair in months, so I put it in the closet. Then yesterday I went to stand up and almost went to the floor. I’ve had NO trouble walking in months. Now my legs are very weak. It just hits me in “episodes”–one part of the day I’ll be sort-of okay; the rest, I am useless. This would make sense if I were currently on antibiotics, but I am not!

I have been sleeping a ton, and in bed all day regardless, only getting up for the essentials like restroom. And the pain… Oh, the pain. A day or two ago–they all blend together at the moment–I couldn’t so much as roll over in bed without a dose of Vicodin. The “headache phase” (because that Migraine went on to irritate every surrounding nerve) has died down for the most part, but now I’m facing exhaustion, flu-like sickness, numbness in my right leg and foot, a bizarre action-related tremor in my left hand/arm that has actually been progressing instead of going away… I am hydrated but my blood pressure is poor, I am resting but my heart is weak… My heart has felt weaker the past several weeks, at random. I don’t know what that’s about (side effect of doubled Biaxin?) but my next cardio appointment is in November.

It’s just such a drastic change, and I was doing perfectly fine (relatively speaking) on the doubled dose of antibiotics until this hit… And despite being off of them, it doesn’t appear to be getting better yet, which is concerning when I’ve literally spent the past week in bed and usually this combination lends to me feeling better… Or at least, when it’s M.E.-related, this lends to me feeling better. I suppose, with that in mind, I should stop thinking of it in those terms, because even though the majority of my troubles the past month-and-a-half have been M.E.-related and those ARE improved with rest, these problems I now face probably are not M.E.-related, and therefore there’s no sense in thinking rest will help them.

Maybe I’m rushing things, or being impatient. I just wonder what happened that I’m taking so long to recover, and I hope this will all pass over without me being forced into a lower state of functioning in the mean time.

So as to my absence…! I have been doing mostly okay, seemingly doing much better–even starting to prepare my own meals!–until “this” happened.

a rainbow at night

Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Consequence of Lyme Disease

…Or bartonella. Or mycoplasma. Or similar infections that are commonly found in the same tick that carries Lyme disease. Unless you’re like me and you happen to get them from other sources like fleas, because you’re immunocompromised and collect infections like some people collect stamps.

I’m not sure which is the true culprit. I know I started getting occipital neuralgia about four months after my tick bite, so that is definitely Lyme disease-related, but I haven’t had an attack of that in a long time; I think it’s been a year?

My serious cranial nerve involvement began when I got Bell’s Palsy immediately after contracting mycoplasma pneumoniae, an infection that usually causes “walking pneumonia” but has been known since the 1970s to also wreak havoc elsewhere, like the nervous system. It can cause just about everything that Lyme disease can, and persist even after treatment by mimicking the body’s own cells. My right eye twitched and my face drooped. I’ve mostly recovered, but some of the damage is permanent. Then my left eye began twitching and it got damaged. That is also permanent. It was all downhill from there as far as nerve damage goes, but I’m here to talk about the ones in my face.

I began treating with Rifampin and Doxycycline in January 2011, and all hell broke loose: That’s when the autonomic neuropathy made itself apparent, culminating in its diagnosis a few months later. I can’t coordinate how it all fits together, but I know my vagus nerve became damaged, my trigeminal nerve got involved somewhere, the Bell’s palsy is a factor (i.e., damage to the seventh cranial nerve, literally called “the facial nerve”), and my migraines are connected.

When the autonomic mayhem landed me in the hospital, I would try to eat something, get an “episode” where my vagus nerve would trigger all sorts of things it wasn’t supposed to, and I’d get a migraine. I got so many migraines I had to be on Topamax for almost a year. Now these days, instead of my nervous system having a meltdown, I’ll sometimes get facial pain when I start digesting, again triggering migraine-like pain on the right side of my face until the digestion stops. This can happen even if I haven’t eaten, but the act of eating can apparently be a huge trigger for trigeminal neuralgia; more on that horror story, below. But how did they all end up triggering each other?

  • The trigeminal nerve is implemented in migraines and facial pain.
  • The facial nerve can also be implemented in facial pain (ha, no kidding!), and the tongue numbness I get.
  • Episodes of trigeminal neuralgia can involve the trigeminal nerve and the facial nerve simultaneously.
  • And the vagus nerve–as it pertains to this post–is responsible for digestion-related reflexes…

But again, how did it come to be that my vagal reflexes got connected to my trigeminal response, in ways they previously were not? All I know for sure is one or more of these infections attacked my cranial nerves, and I’m left with odd, painful remnants as my body has attempted to heal.

 

After my last post, the “tension-headache-thing-that-wasn’t-quite-a-tension-headache”-thing went away and was replaced with the worst episode of trigeminal neuralgia I’ve had to date. Perhaps the tension-like pain was a precursor? (A Lymie friend on Twitter mentioned that she often gets headaches or migraines before her trigeminal neuralgia attacks, too.)

The best way I can think to describe what happened is that, I ate a bowl of crunchy cereal, and immediately after it felt like my teeth were going to explode. It’s one of those things where, if someone else told me the level of pain they were in, I would swear they were exaggerating because how is that possible? My other attacks have been similar–extremely severe, extremely sudden pain that makes you start shaking from its intensity–but it’s never lasted quite this long.

I remember a long time ago writing about another unusual headache, something that acted like “an ice pick headache that keeps on going.” In hindsight, that headache that felt like someone stabbed me in the forehead may have been an episode of trigeminal neuralgia, too. :\ It certainly sounds like it, from what I wrote.

I hate how deceptive it can be, when it starts to fade away only to attack you suddenly again. It took several days to completely go away and stop fading in and out. I have moments of unexplained facial pain daily, anyway, but nothing so severe as that. For my usual, spontaneous facial pain–the kind that is often tied to my digestion for some unexplained reason–butalbital is a huge help. It’s a huge help in my neuropathic pain in general, actually, even though I’ve never heard of anyone else using it for that. Half a tablet of Fioricet (or Bucet, which is the same as Fioricet but without the caffeine; most doctors don’t even know it exists) and that kind of nerve pain is usually gone.

Like occipital neuralgia, nothing much helps trigeminal neuralgia, or at least nothing that my system can tolerate. (Things like carbamazepine are completely out of the question for me.) That night, I was already on hydrocodone and ibuprofen, but had to take twice as much as I usually need, and it still only dulled it enough so that I wasn’t shaking. I couldn’t lie down and put any pressure on my skull until it began to ease.

The gratitude I had for being able to take those pain relievers cannot be put into words. And I’m still trying to wrap my head around the fact that something can hurt that much, and that I went through it. If you’d have told me two years ago I’d be going through something that would make my face feel like I was being stabbed and my teeth as if they were going to explode out of my skull at any moment, I’d have called you crazy.

I feel so much for people who have to go through TN, especially if they have no idea what is causing it. At least I know what is causing mine.

If you do need to be properly evaluated for Lyme disease–and unless you’ve specifically seen a Lyme Literate Medical Doctor or LLMD, you probably do–you can read this and call IGeneX to order a testing kit for your doctor. Igenex has an accuracy rate of 95% and tests for all possible reactive bands, unlike standard testing which only checks you for the most common thirteen and produces a staggering rate of false-negatives. Additionally, you may watch Under Our Skin, an excellent documentary film containing people with illnesses like Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and ALS, who found out Lyme disease was the cause of their symptoms; most recovered. (Not in the US or want more help? Click here.)

a rainbow at night

(Postscript: This is not related to TN, but with this month’s Lyme flare up, I had my old parkinsonism symptoms of slow movements and “freezing” while walking. It’s been a few months since I’ve had those, and they definitely caught me by surprise, especially with how slow my hands were functioning. Those of us with Lyme disease know how startling it can be when you’re doing (relatively) “okay” then suddenly your body thinks it has succumbed to Parkinson’s overnight! Luckily, as usual, it only lasted a few days and I am all right, now.)

Migraines and Caffeine and Surprises, Oh Yes!

I’m pushing it by typing this, but I just can’t help it. I will rest extra tomorrow to make up for it.

I’m excited. There are flowers in my room and I’ve realized they make me very, very happy. Today while lying in bed, I looked around and just admired how incredibly gorgeous my surrounding are, and allowed myself to feel gratitude for it. This is what I wanted, after all–a place to feel peaceful. The weather was wonderful and I looked out of my open window.


That headache I got the other day was a migraine. It kept going away and coming back, so it had me confused, and it didn’t respond to Treximet, which had me more confused. But today, not wanting to take another Treximet because of how awful they make me feel–numbness and dizziness and generally an awakening of all those weird symptoms I get during my autonomic neuropathy “episodes”–I chose to take a risk. I’ve been able to handle some caffeine for a while now, and recently I’ve pushed the boundaries further with no ill results. So I took an Excedrin Migraine, the one thing I’ve used to control my migraines for the past thirteen years. Some may or may not remember the insane reaction I developed to caffeine, but today, nothing happened. Oh, except my migraine going away, that is! I didn’t get any of those dreaded symptoms! I feel I am finally free and healed of whatever occured in my body/brain that made caffeine such a trigger for the past nine months. And I am elated!

Caffeine is a drug, and one that helps me do far more than just stay awake. I can stay awake on my own. But now I can use it to stand up in the mornings, earlier than the two hours I usually need beforehand to avoid passing out. Now I can use it to help me digest food if I begin experiencing post-prandial hypotension. Now I can use it to get rid of my migraines. Now I can use it to help my brain in general! I mean, look at me, typing these entries!

But I am not going to start taking it everyday. Nor am I going to allow it to mask my symptoms so that I overexert, which is dangerous. I’ll probably mess up a few times–not being used to differentiating, after not using it for so long–but that’s all right. I will figure it out!

With that in mind, I shall close this entry, but I wanted to post about this wonderful news. :)

 

a rainbow at night

(P.S. – Oh! And I have a surprise for December!)

Here we go again! (A real post, this time.)

All right. A real update! As far as I’m aware, the strange macular rash on my stomach is gone. For now.

My weekend sickness? Otherwise known as the 7 Day Flare? Well, in the beginning it was from Friday to late Saturday. Eventually it was all of Saturday and Sunday, which is when I mainly started to notice it. A couple of weeks or so ago it started to be Sunday and Monday and now, I think it has moved even further down the week. (I do recall pondering the possibility of it working its way forward, but other things could be causing this, such as when I had to stop antibiotics for a week last month, and the re-exposure to new bugs via the fleas…)

All this weekend, I was fine. On Sunday I even chased my dog around for a minute! But Monday night I started getting an awful headache, which I’ve had since. I’m unsure if it’s a migraine or not, because it moves around and started in my neck, which is not typically migraine-y…? But I did get an absolutely awful episode of Alice in Wonderland syndrome the night before. But yes, then Tuesday wasn’t great, but by the time I awoke on Wednesday I was in full meltdown mode, as if it were a weekend. Then today was even worse. I did have a fever yesterday and much of today, but no thermometer to check its severity. I’ve been so medicated. Ibuprofen every few hours, Lortab every four hours, and I’ve already gone through half a pack of my ginger gum whereas I usually only need one per day! Every morning since Tuesday I’ve woken up with simultaneous excruciating head pain (worse each day), wanting to vomit, and the room spinning. I know some bug is flaring up, because I have been fighting dehydration for three days, and subsequently had very, very bad Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome–I’m lucky to be able to be upright the few minutes it takes for the restroom! Yesterday my father even asked if I needed help getting there, which was truly humbling. (Do I look that bad?) And for it to be happening despite me getting adequate water and electrolytes… It’s typical of my spontaneous bug-related dehydration episodes. (But no hospitals!) Even worse, my cardiac symptoms, which sprung up with September’s Beginning of the Month Lyme flare, are in general so much worse, and they haven’t left yet! In addition to the arrhythmia, I’ve also had chest pain, and I’ve been struggling to breathe. I am always needing to take a deep breath (it’s not air hunger, though) and it gets worse when I lie down. So, further evidence for my electrolytes being off, as far as arrhythmia, but… The chest pain, and then difficulty breathing when I lie down…?

I’m starting to wonder if whatever I picked up from the fleas is affecting me worse than I initially thought. I do have an appointment with my LLMD on the 14th, and I’ll be telling him about all these things in case he wants to test for something. I’m not sure what it would help, since I’m already on the treatment, but… It might be important to document re-exposure, if it did happen. So that’s where we’re at…

…I just took a moment to read my last post and noticed that I had nearly the exact same symptoms last Tuesday and Wednesday. Severe headache that started in my neck, bouts of severe dizziness, and (though I forgot to write it above) I also had shin pain yesterday, just like this time last week… Ah! See, this is why I keep a health blog. :\ I had forgotten all about last week, but there seems to be something of a pattern with these symptoms. I really hope next week isn’t this bad–especially because my appointment is on a Wednesday! That used to be the best day of the week for me, but it’s certainly not anymore. You just have to go with the flow, though. I’ve really been into Buddhist teachings and everything concerning living in the moment. Because that’s all most of us can do–take it one moment to the next, and enjoy as much peace as we can along the way.

Til next post!

a rainbow at night