“Of Course It’s Easy For YOU” Syndrome

© a rainbow at night

“Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.” (Oscar Wilde)

So how do you respond when someone looks at something you’ve worked your ass off for and thinks you only got it because the odds just fell into your favor? How do you process this inherent invalidation of all your struggles, and what does it mean about the person who said it?

When I look back at all that I’ve done over the past year, it really blows my mind. And I did it all because I first made the choice to live and enjoy within the confines of my circumstances, just like I did last year. I set in my mind what I wanted, made whatever arrangements I could on my own to help them manifest, and let the Universe work out the rest based on what I needed to experience.

If I wasn’t supposed to have something yet (or at all), well it wouldn’t have been from my lack of trying.

None of it would have happened if I just blindly accepted the identity of “sick person” that most family members and even doctors wanted to give me; that for too many years I gave to myself, as well. With this identity comes the belief that you must wait until you’re better before you can enjoy your life, whereas nothing could be further from the truth, especially when it comes to long-term or chronic illness.

But in general people don’t want to hear that. Some don’t even want to hear about all that I was able to experience (although I’ve already written about my past endeavors-while-sick), and that’s okay. I know the things I lived, I don’t need further documentation. And because it involved a lot of travel, I don’t imagine they’d be all that interesting to anyone else, anyway, in the same way slide shows of your vacations need to be ambushed upon unsuspecting house guests if you plan to share them.

I might be a little biased on this next part, due to people continuously asking my advice on how to get something I have (emotional freedom and the like, usually), yet being very unwilling to actually do anything that’s even mildly uncomfortable in order to get it. Then they turn around and play this card:

They wish something in their life was as “easy” as I “seem to have it.”

More than a few people have said that to me within a week’s time, and I couldn’t help but laugh.

Because nothing–absolutely nothing–has come easy for me. No one comes to acquire the traits that make life’s difficulties seem “easy,” because life actually WAS easy. No, they arise from having had so much hardship that you eventually learned coping mechanisms to deal with them. Even still, what one might perceive as my ease of living is actually my choice to experience it as such, and I’ve crossed over mountains to get to this place from where I was, because I was not raised to be peaceful. (Please read that. Okay?)

But people only hear what they want to hear, and until they’re ready to change, they resort to, Of course YOU did it, you [insert excuse for why it’s easier for everyone else besides them]. Or else they want to be spoon-fed the exact steps they need to take, as to (1) only do and invest as much work as is necessary and (2) eliminate the natural consequence of following less-strictly-defined steps: fear and anxiety.

This “Of Course It’s Easy For You” Syndrome is also troubling because it’s an unconscious confession of (more fear) self-sabotage. This is inventing excuses for why you can’t have what someone else has, to convince yourself not to even try. It’s giving yourself an “out” based on an external factor out of your control, or something internal you perceive yourself not to have but which someone else does, helping substantiate your belief that the situation is out of your hands.

But if you want things to be easier, it doesn’t start with changing your circumstances, because you can only manipulate your circumstances to the extent that you realize what is really yours to control.

And that all starts with manipulating you.

Society tells us from the day we step outside that your life is supposed to be about getting from point A to point B, and to pass your days filling in the rest with your to-do list of how to accomplish that. But that’s incorrect. Our lives aren’t defined by only the big decisions, goals, and occurrences. However much impact they have on the rest of our days, those major game-changers are few and far between.

Life is mostly made up of all the little moments you encounter between those perceived checkpoints. It’s all the smaller things you do day in, and day out, that make up the most of your life and help determine your happiness. You can have a radically different life without changing a single external circumstance, because the only common denominator in your entire existence, is You. In other words:

When it comes to enjoying your life and finding peace, it has nothing to do with someone else having something you don’t.

And I guess that’s why it doesn’t matter too much to me anymore to explain all that I’ve been able to do, even while sick. Although reaching those goals was inexplicably amazing, it’s the process of living and thinking that helped me manifest them at all, which holds the most value in the long run. And that’s the part I really want to share with this blog.

a rainbow at night

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Let’s talk about my New Year’s resolutions.

There are lots of things I’ve wanted to do, but chose not to in the interest of preserving spoons for a perceived “better time,” which I imagined occurring after treatment when I would feel better/not need to devote my energy solely to physical healing. Buuuuuuuut with the failure of all those treatments and my subsequent new-found sense of Now… Let’s talk about my New Year’s resolutions.


I’m going to listen to one audiobook per month since I can finally afford an Audible subscription.

Truly, “serendipity” doesn’t even begin to describe what the Universe has effortlessly brought into my life since The Big Relapse began. Everything I’ve needed to get through each stage has practically been placed into my hands with a loving, “Here you are, my dear.”

So it shouldn’t have come as too much an additional surprise when my friend Barbara posted about this book, A Year to Live: How to Live This Year as If It Were Your Last, by Stephen Levine.

Click to read more on Amazon.com

Even before I saw it, I had the mindset that I was going to take 2013 by the horns and embrace all of it as if this could be “it,” even if it wasn’t. Turns out, there’s an entire book dedicated to this very thing! And Barbara is reading it! And now I am, too, as my first audiobook. (Downloading the Audible app onto my smartphone made this especially accessible, and the Philips SHE3580 series earbuds make it very comfortable for someone sensitive to pain to listen whilst lying down.)

Another thing that I just found–or that just found me, perhaps I should say–is The Big C, one of those shows you’re interested in but it just doesn’t feel like the right time to watch it. Until you finally do, and realize it could have never impacted you more than it was right then. ♥ I’m excited for the finale this Spring! (I’m excited at the prospect of being alive in Spring, aha!)

Speaking of which, on to my next resolution.

 

Many may have seen what I’m calling “the Joy Jar.” The idea is to write good things that happen to you during the year on pieces of paper, and put them into a jar. At the end of the year, you will have a fine opportunity to get a papercut a collection of events that made you happy to reflect upon, and it can help people focus on the positive side of life when it’s so much easier to focus on what you lack, or what you perceive to be wrong. But I thought I’d augment the idea into something I can actually see myself doing.

journal
Several years ago a friend gave me this journal that I didn’t get to write in very much before illness worsened.
Every day, I am going to write one good thing/something for which I am thankful. And I’m going to continue my goal to attain fluency, so I will be writing it all in French.

 

One of the most unexpected things I realized at the end of last year, was that I am so very tired of only leaving my house for doctors. It usually takes at least two days of carefully organizing spoons, one day of rest, and several stabilizing medications, to get me out of the house in a semi-functional capacity…and arrive at an appointment. Why? Because it’s critical for my physical health. So what made me think that my emotional health was any less important? I’m such an advocate for taking care of your mind, and yet I completely surpassed the notion of that care applying to something like this, too.

So I’m getting out more, to do things that don’t involve anything medical.

I fought for years to be able to breathe again and walk again and I’d like to do things–important things, fun things, memorable things!–while I’m still able. I shall go to the theatre more–performing arts and movies, visit more with friends, and dine at one new restaurant per month with my family.

English: The 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso in...
The 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso in Antwerpen, Belgium 2006
And I have plans to see His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama this year!

Such an event is also on a friend’s bucket list, so we’ve decided to go together. I’ve already gone to the park this month, and in a few weeks I am going to the zoo. (I love the zoo; I used to go every year.) Other things I have planned for the near future are going to see a local chamber orchestra, going to a dance performance (with seats in the front row balcony), and taking my niece to see Jurassic Park in 3D… I may think of more, who knows!

 

Finally, I’ve vowed to follow through with my artistic urges, wherever they lead.

I’m going to express myself through whatever creative means are natural to me. I’m going to write uninhibitedly, because

“Those who matter don’t mind, and those who mind don’t matter.” (Bernard Baruch)

I’m going to use those watercolours, the GOOD paints and the NEW brushes and the SPECIAL paper I’d been saving for “important” projects. And I’m going to take those pictures, I’m going to record more memories with my gorgeous new Samsung WB100 digital camera with HD video, 16.2 MP resolution, and 26X optical zoom.

“If you bring forth what is within you, what you bring forth will save you. If you do not bring forth what is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you.” (as attributed to Jesus in The Gospel of Thomas)
I’m going to live my life this year, and no longer put things on hold.

Did you make any resolutions this year? Do you believe in making them, or are you the type to make a decision whenever you feel ready for it, New Year or not?

a rainbow at night

What do you really want your good health for, anyway? (Don’t wait.)

It probably shows in my recent posts that I’ve gone through a lot of changes in the past few months, physically and mentally.

When you’re in treatment for an illness like chronic Lyme disease, ideally you have to put off certain goals or extra activities because letting your body heal is the priority. And when you have something like myalgic encephalomyelitis, you shouldn’t push yourself too much because abstaining from chronic over-exertion will give you the best long-term prognosis; repeated self-induced “crashes” will harm you.

But faced with two relapses, the possibility of another gradual decline, and the complete mental and emotional exhaustion that arises after four consecutive years of fighting for your life, I came to some big conclusions in early December:

This is the only life I have, it’s okay to make whatever decisions I think are necessary to live it, and I cannot put anything on hold anymore.

There is no longer a “things I’ll do when I get better” category in my brain. And it’s not that I don’t believe I can get better–I believe anything is a possibility.  (And how I love that word. “Possibility.” Almost as much as I love the word “indefinitely.” Indefinite possibility means, at once, what is uncertain is also limitless.) But like I said a few posts ago, even looking forward positively is still not living in the moment. You can’t get caught up in all the things you’re looking forward to having or being or doing, because you’ll miss the opportunities of the only life you actually have–the life you’re currently living.

Besides, what do you really want your good health for, anyway? I realized that many of the things I wanted to do were still possible if I just went about them a different way and stopped waiting for that imagined “better time” in the future… A future I’m not even guaranteed to get.

Would you live your dreams? Well, find some that are still achievable, and get started. If there aren’t any, create new ones.

Would you spend more time with your family? You can still prioritize that, you just have to do it differently than when you were “healthy.”

Would you be a better spouse/parent/friend? Don’t wait to unveil that version of yourself you’ve always imagined. They’re in there, and you can get closer to being that person moment-by-moment.

Another thing I learned is that I can’t expect people to understand where I am with this, if they haven’t been here.

My blog is (for my expression, but) less for people who are just now starting their fight than it is for people who have went a few rounds with their disease until they had to just Let It Be. I’ve had people think me delusional for their lack of understanding, just as I probably would have thought of someone like The Current Me, back when I was just starting out. And that’s okay. I hope they find this place gracefully if they also end up navigating it.

So with that in mind, I made some resolutions for this year. To be continued…

a rainbow at night