New month, new progress, new test results

Spider Web, Rockefeller Forest, Humboldt Redwoods State Park © a rainbow at night

I’m pleased to be writing that I’ve made many great strides in getting my life back on track over the last three weeks. I logged back into my Twitter account and began using it on a daily basis; participated in two “spoonie” meet-ups online, #SpoonieChat and #SCTweetFlix; am replying to some messages when my brain has readily-available thoughts on the topic; and have joined a sort-of spoonie/artist/support group/project, even if I only participate sporadically.

Other things haven’t changed so much. I have yet to open any e-mails, or even log-in to my account for that matter. And I’m still staying far away from the M.E. community and the Lyme disease community, i.e. anything to do with that style of advocacy or activism. I momentarily tried to look at how the Lyme community was fairing, but immediately saw memorial posts concerning a young woman’s suicide. I’m not psychologically prepared for that constant exposure again, as I think I’ve made very clear. I stepped into the M.E. community to test the waters, also, but that was equally a mistake.

Mostly, I’ve gained back a lot of personal power that I didn’t even realize I’d given away. I’m on a journey here, and no one has the right to tell me how far along, or at what point on their map, I should be at. I don’t even have the right to talk to myself that way. I’m also under somewhat less stress now that I’m no longer shouldering my family members through their own recoveries. I still have a lot of trouble communicating, particularly in person, but since being on antibiotics for two weeks, that has temporarily improved. In hindsight I wonder if all my temporary improvements in brain function were due to the antibiotics, or just this time.

Now that I’ve moved into the part of grieving where you can look back and see why you handled things the way you did, I realize that I didn’t do much honouring of the choices I made, even the unconscious ones. But I now have the opportunity to re-frame and integrate the experience, so I’m going to take it.

I honour the parts of myself that knew not make my drama everyone else’s responsibility. I honour the parts of myself that recognized I had to heal a little bit more first, or all my interactions would be coloured by distortions too thick to see through. I honour the parts of myself that knew I needed merciful stillness, not ruthless force, and I honour that which gave me permission to listen.

Whereas part of me assumed I’d be swallowed by deep regret over the time lost, friendships lost, and God knows what else once I finally got free, I very surprisingly feel gratitude. 

I’m grateful for even having had the opportunity to take that “time off” to recover. I’m grateful for all the fights I didn’t provoke out of my own pain, had I forced myself to socialize. (Although, in the state I was in, I can’t imagine I’d have been able to find the words for any argument, honestly.) I’m grateful for me being able to realize I was the one who was overburdened with grief, and that it wasn’t anyone else’s job to revolve their life around me to fix that. (Not that I would even do that, but I recently witnessed someone who was blaming an entire community for their own emotional suffering, to the point that they thought the community had to change to make them happy. It did make me think, “Damn, I may have trouble being around certain groups, but at least I realize this is a personal issue, and that no one owes me an apology for living their own life the way they’re entitled to do.”)

I’m still terrified that the day will come when I’ll wake up and everything will have changed without me knowing why, that I won’t be able to tolerate anything again, or another severe trigger or actual lived trauma will set me back months or years. Just as I fear that the next bad headache will be the start of another relapse. Just as someone with depression fears that that one day of sadness will turn into six months of crushing despair. The difference now is.. well, probably something neurological, as the antibiotics have shown me. But I’m no longer allowing that fear to stop me from participating in whatever ways I can choose to, while I’m able.

Thanks to meditation, I have long since found the place in myself that knows It’s not the feelings, nor the thoughts, but the One who is experiencing those things. That place in me is always still, no matter what. To be simplistic, that’s what we call “the lion’s roar” in Buddhism, the ultimate truth within us that causes all other noise to fall away, like beings from all four directions bow away from the sound of the mighty lion’s roar claiming its territory.

From my current perspective, I have two options. I can listen to the survivor’s guilt, the irrational shame, and ruin my life (or at least this stretch of it). Definitely allowed, but not recommended, and clearly unbeneficial. Or, while I’m healing, I can remember that the end point of treatment will be to eventually FEEL that those thoughts are untrue, as well as know that. But the way I see it, there’s zero reason for me to wait until I FEEL those things aren’t true before I start living better. I know the chaos is full of lies, regardless. I know they’re lies now, and I’ll know they’re lies after recovery. Why do I have to wait for my ever-so-fickle feelings to catch up with what I already know, when I can just start living that way, right now? Yes, I’ll still have the thoughts, and they’ll still feel true for the time being, but I know they’re not, and I’d rather have the thoughts while I’m attempting to put my life back together, than have the thoughts while I’m holed up in my house for months.

I can’t give away my power to change the things I can. Because this is how I gave away my strength, by forgetting the immensity of power lying within all the tiny, monotonous choices that actually make or break your life. When I saw myself writing in my last post that I’d started to self-perpetuate my suffering, I knew I had to change that, or it was not going to end well. It also gave me a little hope, because I finally saw a piece of this that was within my control. If there was something I was doing to make this worse, then that also meant there was something I could do to make it better, simply by making a different choice. So I did, and here I am, three weeks later, continuing the momentum that sprung from me publishing that last post after six months of complete silence. That post took me three months. This one took me three weeks. That should say enough.

I don’t doubt I’ll still have “good days” and “bad days.” I’m trying to mitigate the chance of another “disappearance” a bit by taking Sundays offline, in hopes that, like so many other symptoms, if I just rest for a bit regardless of how I feel, I may be able to prevent whatever it is that builds up and make me cognitively shut down. I’m not sure if it’ll work, as I still have no idea what causes that, but I’m trying, damn it.


My latest tests results are equal parts disturbing and fantastic. Good news first?

My last homocysteine level before this one–which, in conjunction with a methylmalonic acid bloodtest, helps determines the rate of your folate metabolism, as well as suggest your risk of stroke and blood clots–was almost 30 (29.4). It’s supposed to be under 10.4 at the maximum, which means it was literally three times as high as it should ever be. Not great! Before my folate deficiency really kicked into gear, it was a lovely 7.2 umol/L. Well as of March, it’s all the way down to 15.8, which is basically only 5-points-above-normal. I’m almost cured of my folate deficiency!

Similarly, when I began treating these methylation problems, I could only tolerate a meager 100 mCg of methylfolate every 3 days. Now, I can tolerate a wonderful *500 mCg* every 3 days, and I’ll probably be able to increase that, soon. (As well as B12, of course, but I need more methylfolate than B12 at this point. I’ve found the hydroxo-cobalamin works much, much, much better than any other type, for me. So heads up: If you have the MTHFR C677TT homozygous polymorphisms, in addition to being homozygous–that is, having both/two copies–of COMT V158M, COMT H62H, *and* MAO-A R297R, like myself, you definitely want to take the hydroxocobalamin form of B12 and just save yourself the money and suffering of trying the other forms. Yes, it works even better than methyl-cobalamin.)

My cholesterol levels are also fantastic and I don’t know if I mentioned here yet, but I’m no longer pre-diabetic after a lot of dietery changes to help treat PCOS. No relapses, there, either!

Now the bad news, even though I don’t know how significant this is yet because I don’t see my neurologist until next week. First, I haven’t found the results of my intracranial pressure reading, or else they aren’t putting it on my online chart, so I don’t know what’s going on, there. I did however get the results of my spinal fluid analysis, and while my glucose is normal (I think?), my protein is normal (I think?), and my white blood cells appear normal (pretty sure?), there were two things that were present that were absolutely not supposed to be: Lots and lots of neutrophils, and blood. I know this could point to meningitis, but I’d like to think if that were the case, my doctor would have called, because that’s serious? So I hope there’s some other explanation. I refuse to Google anything and scare the hell out of myself over what could be going on. I’ll find out soon enough.

Also, while I know the results of my MRI must be in by now, they, too, have not yet posted to my online chart, so I don’t know the results. And honestly, with the wave of fear that overtook me while reading the CSF results, maybe that’s a good thing, in the event it does reveal something troubling.


The spinal tap itself went great, but the recovery was peculiar, and combined with missing my IVIG for two additional weeks, I was feeling beyond terrible. The most bizarre symptom was that I could not stand more than two minutes without severe shaking, all over; the kind of trembling that makes even your teeth chatter together. But I wasn’t cold! Luckily it resolved as soon as I lied back down, but that definitely wasn’t in the “this could happen afterwards” care sheet.

About a week after the lumbar puncture/several days after my eventual IVIG infusion, I had all the symptoms of fighting some type of infection, but without a fever. It was enough to make the room tilt and spin whenever I moved, have hot and cold sweats, cause ringing in my ears, and ultimately a severe headache toward the end, but no fever? Then I remembered, I rarely ever get a fever, no matter what is happening. So after several days of that hell, I said “screw it” and started my antibiotics. I immediately began feeling better, as quickly as the next day. I spoke with my immunologist and was given more antibiotics, and I moved my appointment up by two weeks so we can discuss why my immune system isn’t able to stop all these bizarre infections from happening these last six months, even with the IVIG. I’ll also ask about mold exposure, because that’s a real possibility that I haven’t forgotten about.

During all of that mess I spent most of my time tweeting to pass the hours, and in the process befriended some great people. I tend to feel like an outcast on Twitter the longer I’m on there, so we’ll see how long I last on there this time.

Until next time,

 

Kit

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“When conditions are sufficient, things manifest.”

© a rainbow at night

Here are some of the changes I’ve made within the last.. wow, has all this really only happened within the last two months?

  • Exchanged everything I use on my body for an eco-friendly, recyclable, sustainable, chemical-free and usually organic version. (With the help of Amazon Prime, if you’re wondering.) That’s organic and chemical-free shampoo, conditioner, body lotion, deodorant, powder, lip balm, sunscreen, toothpaste, facial wash, and soaps.
  • Exchanged household items for eco-friendly, recyclable, sustainable, chemical-free versions, that don’t harm the environment. Like dish washing materials, laundry detergent, fabric softener, household cleaners, paper towels, bathroom tissue, facial tissue, drain cleaning, and even tape.
  • Sent everything I had to get rid of to TerraCycle, which offers free recycling programs “for previously non-recyclable, or difficult-to-recycle, waste.” This includes unwanted beauty products, foil-lined granola wrappers, water filters, even cigarette butts and ashes; i.e. lots of things you can’t put in your recycle bin. And they even pay you to ship it to them! Continue reading ““When conditions are sufficient, things manifest.””

MTHFR Deficiency Cannot Be Cured, But Treating To Cure is All I’ve Ever Done

Earlier this month I found out I had another new diagnosis, another piece to my chronic illness puzzle.

I found a doctor with experience in the area, and spent three weeks gathering the past 18 months of my medical records and filling out their extensive forms.

And this afternoon, I shredded all of it.

I found out I do, indeed, have the MTHFR gene mutation genetic polymorphism. Two of them, two copies of the C677T mutation, or MTHFR 677 TT, put another way (homozygous). This is not the worst case scenario, which would be one C677T and one A1298C polymorphism. What it does mean–as far as I can tell–is that while people with only one copy of the C677T polymorphism might have mild problems or generally do just fine, people with two copies are at a higher risk for the associated diseases. And it’s a reason why I cannot detox properly. Maybe the reason.

At the biological level, it means my body has trouble converting folic acid–the synthetic, unnatural, manmade form of Folate/B9–into a form that I can use. And because properly converting folic acid is what allows you to properly convert B12 to use, I have trouble there, too. (Or at least, I’m supposed to…?) So because these polymorphisms cause my body to be less efficient, I don’t make enough methylfolate. But you need methylfolate to use folic acid, and you also need methylfolate to use B12 (that is, to convert the common manmade-B12, cyanocobalamin, into the body’s natural, useable-B12, methylcobalamin).

Depending upon how much you randomly know, you may have noticed that says I cannot convert the forms of Folate and B12 that are added to everything, including 99% of vitamin supplements: Folic acid and Cyanocobalamin. They’re in everything because people are supposed to be able to convert them and use them. But I can’t do that very well, so if I consume things that have these, such as in vitamins or enriched foods, I am going to have a build-up of these unusable-to-me forms of vitamins, while never getting adequate amounts of the ones I can use.

This is why taking a multivitamin makes me sick. Even when I was taking my B-complex, I always had to chop them into pieces and only take them a few times per week to avoid sickness. Now, FINALLY, I know why this happens!!

“Folic Acid is Not Methylfolate

“Synthetic folic acid does not exist in the human body. It is found in vitamins, and thanks to the FDA’s wisdom, in enriched flour-based foods (yet another reason to shun flour!).  Multiple enzymatic steps are necessary to convert folic acid into its active form beginning with dihydrofolate reductase in the gut.  Individuals with gene variants, but specifically homozygous C677 should avoid folic acid because of the concern for limited breakdown and subsequent accumulation of this man-made agent. One study has implicated folic acid in suppression of important immune factors called natural killer cells.

Source: Kelly Brogan, MD

All of this is supposed to mean I should have elevated levels of some things and low levels of various other things floating around because I can’t convert them properly… And these excess levels can cause all sorts of problems. But, according to my recent bloodwork–particularly the homocysteine–everything is within normal limits. It’s kind of astonishing, really.

To say I’m appreciative of my body finding ways around this, and making me crave food that would give me what I need, is an understatement. Go body, go! I will help you.


You know what medication makes this worse? Bactrim. This probably helps explain why my liver was fine until I needed Bactrim to finish killing off the bartonella infection. Should I need it again in the future, I will know to take milk thistle or something similar, to offset the effects, BEFORE my body gets too stressed…

And that’s pretty much how I’m going to approach this entire thing. I’m going to learn about it slowly and do what I can do offset the effects–symptom management, palliative care–and let my body continue doing what it can for as long as it can. I may do further research into mild supplementation, but mainly, my outlook is that this is another quirk I get the OPPORTUNITY to manage. Of course I reserve the right to change my mind at any time, but:

I am not going to go into “treatment mode.”

And it took several weeks of lamentation for me to really understand I had that choice, and that it wouldn’t be the same as suicide. As one person put it,

“The media constantly bangs on about how to live. . . They tell you how to preserve your body surgically and chemically so you look younger, slimmer, healthier. Why? Nature is perfect in herself. Every season is beautiful.

To be suicidal is to want to die and take actions to facilitate it. But I want to live. It just so happens that humans are subject to disease and death, and if I continue on the path which I have for the past almost-thirteen years, I will not be able to enjoy my life, the only one I have.

I am going through a whirlwind of emotions with this, and if you think you’re able, you can take the ride with me.

I don’t think I’ve ever been so scared, or happy, in my entire life. To be continued

a rainbow at night


PostScript: I’ve been doing a lot of photography lately in honour of Jeremiah Katches‘ passing, so I’ll be posting some of my pictures at the bottom of my posts. This may be a temporary thing or ongoing (much like life, really), but here you go:

Viruses, more ER visits, and the MTHFR test

I’ve wanted to make some posts, but a few things have set me back. The holidays, unexpected family visitations, and a virus.

Usually I’d go into extensive detail of dates and symptom progression, because the nature of my “viral” infections are questionable as to whether it was an acquired seasonal bug, or a flare-up of something I already have. This was definitely something I caught.

It started with a “feels like I’ve swallowed glass” sore throat and proceeded to cause symptoms of every seasonal fluke known to man…except a cough, THANK GOD! The whole ordeal lasted nine days, if I remember correctly. The first four, my body was trying to figure out what was happening. Aside from feeling especially like hell with glass-throat, I couldn’t tell anything apart from my regular symptoms. And then it abruptly realized I had a bug and went into “attack it!” mode, which sent me to the ER the first time, with rapid-onset fever and of course, dehydration.

The second ER visit was due to intractable head pain. Let’s put it this way: I usually take my pain meds twice a day? I was taking them every four hours, they were only barely working, and I had to set an alarm to wake me up while sleeping to take them or I’d wake up sobbing. It turned out that all the.. I’ll say trauma, of the added stress triggered my occipital neuralgia. Once I figured that out, I was able to treat it, which is to say, use the combination of meds and heat I know to be effective in calming the storm until it passed.

I always say I’d rather have a full-blown migraine for a week than an attack of occipital neuralgia for even one day. They gave me hydromorphone. Twice. (I’ve said to “normals” that they gave me morphine, because everyone know what that is, but they actually gave me Dilaudid, which is about three times stronger than morphine.)

A funny thing happened as I recovered from this. My immune system apparently got distracted from attacking me, and I had much-reduced pain and no vasculitis for about a week. Then it remembered who I was again, but I enjoyed those “days off” from everything!

I haven’t been on ANY of my vitamins or supplements since it started, but another funny thing: I can’t tell any difference. This is a complete 180 from when I was in treatment and I could tell which supplement I forgot by which symptom popped up within the next two days–arrhythmia if I’d forgotten my calcium, a migraine if it was my magnesium, chest pain if Co Q-10. Randomly, but perhaps importantly, I’m REALLY REALLY glad I was taking high-dose Vitamin C in the month prior to that virus finding me! That might be why it took four days to really settle in. (Vitamin C doesn’t help much if you’re healthy, but if you’re immunocompromised it can make a big difference.)

My best guess is that, my body doesn’t need as much help since I am not in treatment? I’d like to think it’s a good thing that I can now survive without supplementation, and I’m not planning on going back on everything unless necessary. I know I need magnesium to preserve my nerve function. And the Co Q-10 for the M.E.; I’ve been having chest pains galore from all the activity sans supplementation to help my muscles recover. And possibly my B-complex, also for nerves, but I’m going to hold off on that until I get the results of this new test I’m having to see if I have the MTHFR gene mutation. (Yes I am aware of what that looks like an abbreviation for, and yes, I laughed.) It can prevent the body from detoxing properly and also cause hyperhomocysteinemia (can we just call that hyperhomo? that’s funny, too) which can result in vascular problems and strange reactions to B vitamins… I have all of that! But of course I have symptoms of everything, so I can’t get TOO excited. It’s a gene mutation genetic polymorphism so it can’t be cured, but it can be managed if we know I have it.

Since I don’t know the rate at which I’ll be posting, I’ll just give you a preview. I’m going to talk about my New Year’s resolutions, how taking a one-month break from Twitter affected me, and how Christianity never helped me deal with the reality of chronic illness. Eventually I will also describe what my pain is actually like, because chronic pain means different things to different people, and I’d like to talk about my version.

See you soon!

a rainbow at night

Well THIS wasn’t supposed to happen so soon.

Being off my olive leaf extract has meant my brain is back to a constant fog. It’s funny, I’ve taken it so long that I really only notice how much it helps whenever I have to take a break for whatever reason. (With most herbs you’re supposed to take a 2-week break about every 4 months, so your body doesn’t become dependent on its effects and forget how to function without it.) Right now I’m breaking because I’m unsure of what effect it has on my liver (being such a powerful antioxidant, it should actually help, but I don’t know for sure), and I don’t want it to mess up my test results when I get my enzymes rechecked next week.

And being off any antibiotic whatsoever apparently equates to the Lyme disease moving to attack my arms. These illnesses have already done damage to my brain, cranial nerves, autonomic nervous system, legs, and now it looks like they’re moving somewhere new. As a friend pointed out, it seems logical that the bugs would try to get my arms, since they’re already weakened from the ME.

That week I was off everything, between finishing bartonella treatment and starting the Lyme treatment, the neuropathy spread to my arms. When I got on Flagyl, as I think I mentioned last post, everything stopped progressing, and I was fine. Now that I’ve been off everything again for a week, it’s going back to my arms… This is almost as disturbing as when the M.E. went to my legs–in other words, it normally doesn’t do that, and for it to be going there means a bad sign. (No dramatizing, just real facts.) I’m silently hoping it won’t do any damage before I get back on treatment. I didn’t think it’d have time to do anything, but with it acting like this…!

In the mean time, I have my B complex, and magnesium to help protect my nerves as much as I can… I stopped my Vitamin C because it can impact total biliburin count and mine is the very lowest at 0.3 mg/dL, so I can’t have that messing up my test results, either.

I know I have very little control over what happens, but the last thing I need is nerve damage to my arms, which already suffer so many restrictions.

Ah, and the point of mentioning the state of my brain, was, I’m still working on those posts I promised, but not much can be done with so much brain fog!

a rainbow at night