Resuming Antibiotics for Lyme-Induced Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

© a rainbow at night

In case you missed it buried within my last post: I learned I do have multiple sclerosis. My neurologist said the official diagnosis as of right now is “Clinically Isolated Syndrome,” which can present with or without optic neuritis. Mine presented with, but I recovered well from that attack and my ophthalmologist confirmed there is no permanent damage to my optic nerves.

CIS and MS are the same disease process, but since MS literally means “multiple scars,” CIS is what you call the first episode, because there are a few people who never go on to develop another attack. But that wasn’t actually my first attack, or even my first documented attack. Because I refused to get a spinal tap at the time, the last lesion was attributed to “post-infectious demyelination” or “atypical MS.” They wanted to test my cerebrospinal fluid for Lyme antibodies at the same time as MS markers, and I couldn’t afford to risk a false-negative Lyme test, which my insurance could’ve used to deny coverage for my antibiotics. I have personally watched someone have their treatment revoked until they did additional spinal taps to prove the bacteria were there, and there was no way I was going to chance that happening to me, as horrendously ill as I already was.

I’ve had about five neurologists since 2008 because they keep moving, so my current neurologist is under the impression this is only my first attack, hence the CIS model. Most doctors rigidly hold the belief that neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease that has spread to the brain and spinal cord) and multiple sclerosis are not related, so my “official” diagnosis will change depending on which doctor I see and their level of understanding about my history. At any given time it’s one or more of the following:

  • Post-infectious demyelination
  • Clinically isolated syndrome
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Atypical MS
  • Relapse-remitting MS
  • Neuroborreliosis
  • Inflammatory disease of the central nervous system
  • Demyelinating disease of the spinal cord
  • Disease of nerves in arms, legs, hands, and feet (what even is this diagnosis?)
Image from “LYMEPOLICYWONK: Misdiagnosis of Lyme disease as MS” by Lorraine Johnson, JD, MBA, and the Chief Executive Officer of LymeDisease.org. Click for more information.

Without medication, I regularly and predictably relapse about twice a year, about 5 months apart. I think the reason for this is, when my immune system starts to run out of options against the accumulating spirochetes, I usually develop a bacterial infection and require a short course of antibiotics, and those antibiotics also beat the Lyme back into remission for about 4-5 months max. But then the bugs build back up again, and my immune system gets stressed again, and I can’t fight off another bacterial problem again, requiring another short course of antibiotics which tithe me over for another 5 months… And so on. Rinse and repeat for the past five years since stopping Lyme disease treatment in 2012.

It wasn’t always so much like clockwork, though, for many reasons but largely because since “the big relapse” in 2012, I’ve only been able to tolerate an infant’s dose of antibiotics for maybe two days before my brain felt like it would explode. That is, until this year’s miracle happened:

In March, I was able to complete a 10-day course of antibiotics with absolutely no problem, for the first time since The Big Relapse. So, coupled with my new diagnosis, I decided to brave Lyme disease treatment again.

Yes, you read that correctly. What I wrote here five years ago has finally come to fruition:

“My friends say I can always begin treatment later after I’ve rested a bit more, but this is the equivalent of waiting until a cancer is stage 3 or 4 to begin treating. The disease is advanced, it’s harder to kill, and the treatment will be that much worse. … But regardless, this may be my only option, and all I can do is hope that with more rest, I will be able to begin treatment again in the future, and be able to handle it.”

My God, to be typing these words… There have been a lot of tears this past week. Over all my suffering, over all the life lessons learned, over all the years it looked like I would never make it here because of the constantly relapsing infections, over all the miracles that took place just in time, every time, so that I evaded further damage, and that I’ve actually healed from much of the damage already sustained… But mainly, over the fact that I am now here, having survived it all physically and mentally, and in a position where I am able to do something about it.

I made it.

And I’m starting treatment again.

We’re going to push it back into remission ON PURPOSE with an ACTUAL TREATMENT PLAN and an ACTUAL DOCTOR, not just skate by on whatever antibiotics I end up on, hoping it’ll be enough to fend off MS for as long as possible. The diagnosis is here! Time is up!


I’m doing pulsed antibiotic therapy this time–please research if you haven’t heard of it–because it turns out this is the best way to handle late stage Lyme disease that anyone knows as of yet. Continuous antibiotics may be necessary at first, but it will eventually come time for maintenance dosing instead of sustained eradication, because while chronic Lyme disease cannot be cured, it can be managed.

And please don’t come at me with your “it CAN be cured!” comments: People can be functionally cured, where the bacterial load is so low that it cannot cause problems, but there is no known way to permanently cure late stage Lyme disease, yet. It goes up there with all the other infections your body just learns to adapt to and live with, but which can cause problems again if conditions arise, and that is okay.

I wish someone had told me this when I first got diagnosed, but we truly are so much more advanced as a society in our knowledge of “chronic Lyme” than we were 11 years ago when I got infected. Back then, biofilms in Lyme were just a hypothesis, as was the idea that antibiotics were causing the bacteria to hide instead of die, both of which are proven facts, today.

It’s actually a comfort to know that even the strongest of bodies cannot keep these spirochetes under complete control, because it keeps in perspective that this is not just “my” body’s failure, or “your” body’s failure, but it’s not even a failure at all: It is the natural course of this disease to relapse and remit, and it is not your fault. There is nothing you were supposed to have done to keep it from doing whatever it’s doing, what it already did, or what it’s trying to do. I repeat, it is not your fault that you still have Lyme disease, and again, late stage Lyme disease CAN be managed. Alright.

Now, according to this 700 patient survey, only 55% of people with Lyme-Induced Multiple Sclerosis get better with antibiotics once the disease has advanced to this level. However, I’ve beaten the odds many times before, so I’m just going to do what I can do for as long as I can do it. This online research has many limitations but it does mirror the general consensus I’ve heard throughout the years.

Image from “LYMEPOLICYWONK: Do antibiotics help patients with Lyme disease who are also diagnosed with MS?” by Lorraine Johnson, JD, MBA, and the Chief Executive Officer of LymeDisease.org. Click for more information.

The reason for these hit-or-miss success levels is believed to be because killing the bacteria when they have already initiated an attack on your nervous system has the potential to further advance the disease instead of abating it, because when the bacteria die they cause an inflammatory reaction. Adding further inflammation, in the form of your immune system going in to clean up dead bugs, to an area that is already inflamed because the immune system is already active there, will make things temporarily worse. The $64,000 question is whether the brain will recover or is there so much infection that this additional inflammation caused by the dying bacteria will be just as bad if not worse than the inflammation caused by just letting the disease take its course.

People with tapeworms in their brain face a similar dilemma: Because a dead worm in your brain could trigger such a massive immune response to clean it up, many must simply live with the parasite latent in their brain instead of attempting to kill it, which could actually turn around and kill them, too. We need to realign our focus with living a good life, not becoming “bug free.” They are not mutually exclusive.

I couldn’t pulse antibiotics five years ago because treating bartonella was the priority, and you cannot do pulse therapy with bartonella bacteria present. They mutate far too quickly in their attempt to survive, and become resistant to the antibiotics used. Some antibiotics like Rifampin can lose their efficacy after just one break in treatment, rendering it permanently ineffective against the strains present. So, long story short, I needed continuous antibiotics for bartonella for about two years, with lots of complications, it still relapsed, and only starting IVIG two years later saved me. But before all the latter happened, I made it about six months on continuous Lyme-specific antibiotics–the same ones I’m on now–before I hit the infamous treatment wall and became too ill to tolerate absolutely anything. I.e. “The Big Relapse.”

(I feel like I repeat myself a lot here, but I know most people don’t have the time or energy to go back and read how I got here or why my treatment is taking/has taken this route. All that is available, though, if you’re interested–there’s a directory of categories and tags/content at the bottom of this site.)

We’ve no way of knowing how I’ll respond to things this time, but just based on how I responded to mere Amoxicillin at the beginning of this year, I think I stand a chance to respond favorably. I’m running out of time to do something here, regardless. According to my last MRI, there’s a potential “something” in the front part of my brain that they’re going to “watch.” I just did two spinal MRIs and should find out the results this week.

One amazing thing I learned, though–again, only by getting a copy of my MRI results–is that I have successfully REmyelinated! The biggest brain lesion from my first Lyme/MS attack is fully healed!! About a year or two ago, I suddenly realized I could walk in the dark again without falling over, which I hadn’t been able to do since my hospitalization around 2010/2011. I assumed my brain had found some way around this damage by using its innate plasticity (i.e. maybe it formed some new pathways to circumvent the lesion) but no! Even better! It HEALED!

I am so proud of my body and its resilience. It’s things like this that inspire and remind me that it’s not too late to heal, and that my body still prioritizes towards homeostasis and wellness.

I’ve finished my first pulse, and I already feel so much clearer in my head it’s ridiculous. I owe this entire post to those antibiotics. In fact the last several blog posts I published before this one were antibiotic-induced (haha), where I hadn’t been able to finish anything since they wore off. The only thing I managed to type for this post before starting treatment last Thursday was one paragraph that took me an hour and a half, that absolutely exhausted me and ultimately made such little sense I had to delete it altogether, anyway. But after antibiotics? I typed the entire draft of this post you’re reading, in one day. Another day was spent editing, and today I finished polishing it up to be scheduled for tomorrow morning. But go ahead and tell us, IDSA, how antibiotics don’t do anything for us, will you?

Experiencing this phenomena again essentially confirms to me (1) how I was ever able to maintain this blog all those years ago, and (2) why I steadily and progressively lost the ability to write the longer I went without antibiotics, eventually getting to the point where I could only post when I’d taken an antibiotic or two, or when I’d scraped together one paragraph per month until I had something legible:

All I ever needed was treatment for this disease.

Damnit.

Until next time,

Kit

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The Killer in the Crowd

♪ “Who is the betrayer, who’s the killer in the crowd?
The one who creeps in corridors and doesn’t make a sound.” ♫

Something I never considered the IVIG might do was the one thing I’ve diligently avoided doing at all costs for the past two years: Wake my immune system from its compromised state of complacence. Because that, in turn, as has happened every single time over the past six years, would reactivate my latent bartonella infections.

But that’s exactly what it did.

Some of you may not remember my ordeal with this infection unless you’ve somehow been following my blog since the beginning, but this short post from January 2012 might help a little.

I realized a year later that my symptoms were re-emerging and my bloodwork showed increasing signs. From then on I did everything I could to not stimulate my immune system, especially avoiding antibiotics at all costs (i.e., in the event I caught something extra; because as we know this entire treatment-failure conundrum was caused by me being unable to tolerate antibiotics to treat the Lyme, bartonella, mycoplasma, etc.). Because of this, and thankfully so, it remained somewhat latent in contrast to how quickly it spread the first few times it was active. From past experience, I’d seen that activating my immune system in any way triggered it to attempt fighting infections wherever they existed, despite my immune system not having everything it needs to actually fight, or even being able to use what it does have, efficiently. I’d found out the hard way that to reactivate bartonella was to initiate my imminent decline: The first time this happened, I was bedbound within eight months; the next, within just four.

Well. All the symptoms that have occurred periodically since the bartonella relapsed, are once again emerging VERY reliably every 5-6 days (usually five, as is part of the reason bartonella “quintana” got its name). There are the frontal headaches; the unusual rashes and bumps on my feet, ankles, lower legs, and hands/fingers; the foot pain; the shin pain; chest pain; more arrhythmia; more anemia; the volatile moods that occur the worst on that 5th day, leading to rapid cycling between hopelessness, suicidal ideation, rage, paranoia, and anything else you can imagine, before fading as quickly as it arrived; the worse “brain fog” and neurological dysfunction; low-grade fevers; excruciating fatigue; worse dehydration… Unsurprisingly, its pattern started five days after my first infusion in October, and has continued ever since.

A part of me just cannot believe this is happening again. The other part of me has not experienced something so dangerous since practicing Buddhism, and is able to be objective enough to find it fascinating how a body reacts to infection.

The worst flares–the ones that scare me–happen right before my infusions, when my immunoglobulin levels are at their lowest. I get IVIG every four weeks, but at my current dose the effects only last three weeks… So the fourth week, my system has fallen back to its usual, immunodeficient state, which means I am at mercy of a potentially-fatal infection with little to give it pause.

I discussed this with my immunologist today and he has upped my dose. We’ll see with my next infusion if this new dose will last long enough to stretch the entire four weeks, but if not, we’ll try every three weeks. If that doesn’t work, then I’ll have to do it subcutaneously every week just to stay stable. :\ (I hope not; I don’t know if I could handle that, mentally.)

I felt so horrible the morning of my last infusion, I thought I might more likely end up in the emergency room than their office, and wasn’t even sure if I should go. But within two minutes of praying for guidance, my doctor’s office called me and told me to come in, come in immediately. So I did, and by that evening I was a different person. For one, I was hydrated, but I also no longer felt like I was being mauled by a bear from the inside out. The flare completely stopped.

For the first time in over two years, I feel like I have a chance to slow these diseases’ progressions. And after seeing how my body can now fight back after receiving an infusion containing the parts of my immune system I’ve never adequately been able to create on my own, I have hope that maybe I can be like everyone else who gets a bartonella infection, and just kill it off before it kills me. This can really only go one of two ways.

If I can continue getting IVIG reliably then maybe several months from now my new-and-improved immune system, thanks to literally thousands, upon thousands, upon thousands of donors, can finally overthrow bartonella (and maybe the other, less-rapidly-progressive bugs?), and I’ll never have to worry about it again. That’d be nice… Really nice. But if not, I know this is still my path.

I regret nothing.

a rainbow at night

A Relapse Within a Relapse

Avenue of the Giants, Humboldt Redwoods State Park © a rainbow at night

First, I can’t thank anyone enough for the response on my last post; it was quite unexpected. I’m glad to have touched the hearts of so many and to have received such a beautiful outpouring of love and support in the comments and e-mails that followed. It really helped me feel less alone, and you should all stop to think of how amazing you are for reaching out to a practical stranger. Thank you.

Right now the biggest thing on my mind is, a friend of mine who I wrote about several months ago, Brooke, is in the very final stages of myalgic encephalomyelitis. There were recently several weeks when insurance troubles denied her hospice care, during which she deteriorated very quickly. I do know she is getting at least some pain relief, and that is a blessing, and recent complications hint that it might not be too long…which is probably a blessing, too, if you ask me. She worked extremely hard to produce this post and a subsequent one to cover any confusion about her decision to deny “life saving” measures (questionable terminology) such as feeding tubes, which would only work to extend her suffering past her natural end. Her family will be delivering any updates as they occur.

[ETA: As of writing this, she’s managed to produce one more post clarifying that her amazing doctor convinced hospice to accept her for another 60 days. And amazingly, her bravery has led to being a part of an upcoming documentary about the severity of true myalgic encephalomyelitis, one that might chronicle her passing from this world in an effort that will accomplish her original goal of Documenting M.E. and all that it entails, to help spread the truth for us all.]


Also, I’m in the midst of a further relapse. My health has been in a state of decline since June, and additional stressor after additional stressor pushed my body over the edge. Or at least that’s what I assume happened, because I can’t pinpoint one particular thing that did it. I do know the emotionally draining act of writing a goodbye letter to my friend–because life happens–sent me into incapacitating illness for a straight week, during which I was struggling to remain conscious every single day. It was quite scary, but I’ve since become able to stay awake more easily…

It actually took me a while to realize I had relapsed. When I first felt the decline, I expected to recover in a few days, as my health is highly sporadic and changes every day, every hour, every ten minutes some days… And I even expected this recovery might be more extended because of the seemingly continuous stream of triggers… But while I was knocked out last week, it occurred to me that my waiting to improve back to my previous levels of energy had spanned about 8-9 weeks already.

I may write further posts on this and other topics, soon, but right now it’s easier for me to do other things that only require small periods of focus. I’m updating my website behind the scenes, mostly.

Please continue to send your prayers, metta, and positive thoughts to our dear Brooke, her husband, and the rest of her friends and family. Also, to everyone who has recently subscribed here, thank you, and rest assured I will continue to write. (The Life Lessons section has a collection of my favourite posts, in the mean time.) My girlfriend might even be helping write a few sections and/or articles. If you want to contribute either with writing or links that you’ve found particularly helpful, don’t be shy about getting in touch! This site is for my expression, but the information I stand behind should be for the benefit of all.

I shall be focused on finding stability in this relapse.

a rainbow at night

On Livers and Lyme and Dystonia…and Another Antibiotic Break

On Thursday, the 5th of April, I upped the minocycline to 200mg a day. For the next few days I only noticed a greater need for sleep. Since starting the minocycline in general, I had a greater need for lortab/vicodin (at least once a day) to deal with the head and neck pain (read as: severe), so that also got worse temporarily before tapering off into less-severe pain.

Mostly because of this, my sinuses were really bothering me (hydrocodone causes a release of histamine, and when you stop it, then you can get a rebound release of it), so I had to take Nasonex for several days–it helped so much, and by days Three and Four of being on it, I was outside taking pictures of flowers!! I figure it might have been helping subdue some of the herxing because of its immunosuppressive tendencies. After day Four I was able to stop that, too, since my sinuses had returned to normal.

Then on the 9th I got a fax from my doctor saying my liver enzymes were very elevated. This, after them being perfectly normal two weeks earlier, and me still taking milk thistle three times a day!! I was upset, but I had to stop all antibiotics again.

I don’t know if it was from not taking my antibiotics beginning that morning when I got the fax, or rebound inflammation from stopping the Nasonex, but I felt absolutely horrid starting that day, and did every day after/have every day since. We’re talking complete flu-feeling and just.. awful. It was the metaphorical equivalent of hitting a bear over the head once, and then standing there staring at it. Lyme is a very, very angry bear. To further my physical suffering, a few days later my Lyme flare up began! D:

And then an old Lyme-related friend came to visit me: Dystonia.

(I tried to kick it out–you must mean the house down the street; no Kit, here!–but, that didn’t work.)

And not just dystonia, but that special brand of dystonia with parkinsonism thrown in there that makes me unable to walk, that makes everything on my left side either fail and freeze, or flail and dance. (Why does Lyme like the left side so much? No one can figure it out, not even the doctors.) It began on the 14th, when I got out of bed, took two steps, and my left leg decided it wanted nothing to do with this “walking” business. Luckily, there are wheelchairs. I still had a lot of movement problems even wheeling about the house, but standing up makes it so much worse in general, even if I’m not trying to walk. It got worse on the 15th and 16th…

I wish I could adequately describe what this type of movement disorder is like. A dear friend of mine in Pennsylvania with Lyme disease has the exact same problems I do (also hypertonia, also brain lesions). A typical “episode” of this happening might start with me attempting to walk. A varying amount of time passes before I slow dramatically and then my left leg will start to drag. If I stand in one place it often curls inward. If I try to walk it is essentially frozen, or moves so little that I might end up walking on the tips of my toes to compensate. Something around my hip/thigh happens and my leg jerks upward, causing me to simultaneously fall forward, often twisting my neck to one side at the same time “for some reason.” I don’t always have to be walking for this to occur. I know low oxygen (or at least low oxygen ratio) makes this worse, because supplemental oxygen always helped in the past.

“A major principle of body movement is that all muscles have an opposing muscle. Movement is possible not just because one muscle becomes more active, but because the opposing muscle relaxes. …Rigidity comes about when, in response to signals from the brain, the delicate balance of opposing muscles is disturbed. The muscles remain constantly tensed and contracted so that the person aches or feels stiff or weak.”

Other times it involves my face and neck–like an episode of Bell’s Palsy that isn’t so much the nerves (I don’t think, at least) as it is the muscles contracting, and causing issues like facial grimacing, an inability to open my left eye all the way (lots of times I cannot look upwards, which is truly disturbing–I don’t think this is dystonia but I wanted to mention it anyway), and my tongue might tremor, etc.

This time, much to my dismay, my arms were involved, interferring with my typing. :( It wasn’t the M.E., and it wasn’t the neuropathy that’s started to invade my arms causing the weakness, but something different. (It’s probably impossible for me to put the difference into words, but I know what that feels like.) They were doing the same thing my legs did–gradually getting slower and slower and it was as if the nerves were failing to send adequate signals, where in my head I was sending them the action I wanted them to perform but everything was going very..very…..slow……… :| (But not the paralysis and takes-five-days-to-recover like the M.E. muscle failure; this is far more neurological.)

And then the 17th happened. Or rather, the night of the 16th, when I tried to sleep. I spent all night waking up every hour going “omg I’m going to vomit” and “omg why is everything moving” and then when I woke up once at 7am, the back of my head was killing me (figure of speech, of course). And thus began the cycle of the next five days. But at least after about the 18th, the dystonia and parkinsonism got better and I could walk again. Oh, the things I had happen every morning… One morning was like I described above; for another, it was all I could do just to roll onto my back and take medicine; for another there was gastrointestinal nerve problems that immobilized me in pain; then to add insult to injury, I woke up dehydrated, because I usually do during Lyme flares. It has been an incredibly difficult couple of weeks!

What got me through it was knowing that it would pass.

And it did.

The 22nd I felt good enough to take a ride to the city, with the help of adequate medication for pain and inflammation. Right now I’m waiting for a supplement to arrive (tomorrow), so I can resume antibiotics.

I can’t thank God enough for such an absolutely amazing doctor to get me through all of this. Especially after so many years of people who didn’t know what they were doing, no idea how to help me, or just passing me around from doctor to doctor. (From primary to cardiologoist to neurologist to immunologist to infectious disease specialist to another cardiologist to another neurologist to a movement disorder specialist to…) I feel safe in God’s hands and my LLMD’s experience to get me better. He called and told me this herb collection to order for my liver, called Liver Chi. He says he has patients with Lyme-induced MS who are on triple IV antibiotics, their liver enzymes inevitably going high, but who can’t stop treatment for fear of their disease progressing. He thinks I am in that group with the rate that my symptoms progress the moment I stop antibiotics. And if this supplement (a mix of chinese herbs) has been able to bring theirs back down to normal, on all of those antibiotics, I’m sure it can help me get back in treatment! So he said to take a two-week break (which I have), and.. essentially, don’t wait, get the herbs, and resume treatment whenever I got them. And of course keep checking my enzymes.


I’ve been indulging my creativity to help me cope, so here are a few pieces:

a rainbow at night


PostScript: Things I want to add into this post but have no idea how:
  • Ibuprofen always helps. Always.
  • My PCP says I should tell my cardiologist about the fact that I feel like I’m going to pass out when I take a deep breath–I actually had to lie on the examining table this time, which is new. My first guess is my usual lack of my heart rate variability and the fact that it’s supposed to vary when you inhale deeply, but mine often doesn’t… But that’s autonomic neuropathy for you.

Three ER Visits and a Hospital Stay: What Happened

In case anyone was wondering why I haven’t been around, it’s because I’ve been in the hospital. If you’re on my Facebook or Twitter then you already know this. I went to ER three times in less than 24 hours, so they eventually kept me. I was there from Sunday night (Feb 27th) to Friday (Mar 4th) from these “episodes” that acted like seizures, but weren’t. The antibiotics didn’t technically cause it, i.e. it wasn’t an adverse reaction, but the medicine killing the bacteria definitely woke something up, so everything entered into a sort of revolt and my body–particularly my nervous system–could not cope. I talked to my LLMD from the hospital, and he told me to stop all Rifampin and Doxy for two weeks, only using the Doxy to avoid another emergency room trip. (You cannot stop bartonella treatment “cold turkey” because THAT can land you in the hospital, as it has for me in the past.)

My body has been fighting a lot of things these past two weeks. In addition to what I already had, my labs suggested an unidentified virus lurking, for which I can do nothing right now; I’m anemic because of the infections that I can’t treat; my blood sugar has been high (because of stress reaction I think);  and I haven’t been absorbing proper nutrition OR essential vitamins, yet I’ve also been unable to handle my nutritional shakes, so it seems inevitable that I will lose more weight. When everything else went south, my liver decided it couldn’t deal with my antibiotics, either. However my body also cannot cope withOUT the antibiotics either, since bartonella comes back with a fierce vengence in a very small amount of time, so I may very likely end up in the hospital this weekend if things take a wrong turn. All I can do is pulse the Doxy on Saturday and Sunday, and hope for the best. I’ve officially run into a treatment failure, despite us being so careful to avoid it. I’ve been very, very ill and unable to handle ANY of my medicine, even my herbs. Things got.. pretty bad.

You know, I really should be more specific in my prayers. Like, instead of asking to “make it to Saturday” without an ER visit, I probably should have extended that to the whole weekend! Because leave it to me to feel in the clear on Saturday, and then end up in the hospital on Sunday!

I guess it all started Saturday evening/night, February 26th. I watched a lot of TV, including two movies without pause, which doesn’t sound like much, but for someone with M.E., watching four-five hours of straight television and actually paying attention? That’s a lot of energy. Too bad it doesn’t affect me then and there. It was fun, and worth it, but I should have rested after that. I didn’t.

So the next day a lot of bad things came together:

  1. The relapse from the previous night began hitting me.
  2. Doxycycline takes 10 days to build up to its highest levels in your nervous system, and it was day ten.
  3. I had a small argument with my mother which stressed me out further and I am not supposed to get stressed out.
  4. I overexerted further: I just wanted to lie down in the living room and watch two movies with my family… I didn’t think it’d get me as sick as it did.

So by 7pm Sunday, I was sick as a dog (why do people say that?), herxing severely, having a Migraine, and I guess my nervous system just.. had enough. I had been having severe tremors all day, but then my muscles began spasming and going numb interchangeably. I went to my mother’s room for safety. She looked at me and immediately started making a list of my current medications for the hospital staff. (Mother-premonition?) I then proceeded to have this seizure-like episode of my limbs going numb, my tongue going numb, an inability to swallow (though I could breathe all right), and uncontrollable convulsions. My stomach felt this “rising” sensation and my speech was slurred whenever I did try to talk. This happened three times between Sunday night and Monday evening, so by the third ambulance trip, and me failing the Pronator Drift test (a neuro test, indicating a upper motor neuron lesion) they kept me.

“It” proceeded to happen again that night, twice on Tuesday, and once on Wednesday. I was discharged from the hospital Friday morning (4th) and I had a minor attack that evening. Then another minor attack on Monday, and one on Tuesday (the 8th). They were getting less severe and.. more Migraine-like than seizure-like, but then I had another bad attack two days ago on Wednesday, complete with a few minutes of convulsions. :\ But for the most part, instead of full-on convulsions I get some muscle twitching, and the “main event” is now a tingling sensation in my stomach and chest, abrupt numbness of my arms, neck, face, jaw, tongue, all mostly on the right side, and sudden slurred speech. (I still suspect some nerve around there is really messed up, perhaps that vagus nerve that has been giving me so much trouble recently.)

There are some very odd happenings that make it nearly impossible to find the true cause. I’m not sure there is just one, really. The first time it happened after drinking an Ensure; the second after taking Rifampin; the third after eating a hamburger; the fourth after eating again; the fifth after an Ensure; the sixth-thru-whatever numbers were correlated with either Ensure drinks or Migraines. In fact I’ve had a Migraine on.. Sunday (Feb 27th), Tuesday, Thursday, Tuesday (Mar 8th), and yesterday. Also, during the first three episodes, I really, really had to pee before it happened. Like, an abnormal amount, but I wasn’t drinking that much, so it didn’t make any sense. Nothing makes any sense, besides my nervous system just went into some type of overload/failure. I’m sure the exertion worsened it, as did the antibiotics/herxing, and for a time I developed the same sensitivity to Ensure as I have to daily multivitamins. I cannot take vitamins because they cause this unusual, terrible reaction where I become in a paralytic-like state for about 8 hours. And because of the number of times this happened shortly after drinking an Ensure–even though I’ve been drinking them for weeks and it helped me stop losing weight–it looks like I’m having a similar reaction to the nutrition in them, after a certain point. But why it happened after I ate? I have no idea. And why did I have to pee so badly before them? What the hell?

I’ve had intermittent arm numbness since I started antibiotics, which I’ve mentioned on here repeatedly. (And oddly enough, it was in conjuction or following severe headaches, remember? They didn’t seem like Migraines at the time, but now, I wonder…) So the antibiotics woke something up, I guess. And I also mentioned here, I’ve had increasing trouble swallowing for the past four weeks, which made it impossible to eat a lot of things. It cumulated into a full inability to initiate swallowing last Tuesday, and it was pretty scary for a while. I didn’t want to end up with a feeding tube. :( Other things of possible note are my more frequent arrhythmias and tachycardia, which annoyingly never happened during any of the three times they checked my heart rhythms! But they did run a LOT of tests of me, over twenty-five. Included was an EEG, and the results would insinuate I’m not having seizures, but the sad part is, you can still have seizures and have a normal test result. :\ So. Yeah. They ultimately found:

  • I have a rotated kidney! This has been present since birth and poses me no problem.
  • I now have moderate mitral regurgitation in my heart.
  • A spot on my brain, which made me very, very angry.

Because I’ve had three MRIs in the past two years. Three MRIs. I’ve had this lesion in my brain during the last THREE scans of my brain, and no one said anything about it! It wasn’t on my 2003 MRI, but it’s been there since at least 2009, and has gotten “minimally more prominent.” I got Lyme in 2006, and both Bartonella and Mycoplasma in 2008 (when my neuro symptoms really took off) so my best assumption is, they did it.

But speaking of brains, they had me see a shrink to make sure I wasn’t just causing these problems out of anxiety. And I can’t really blame them–my doctor mainly wanted to make sure anxiety wasn’t worsening my problems–because truly my symptoms were very anxiety-like; if I didn’t know me, I would have made the same assumption. But as you can imagine, the results of that were, “She’s sane,” which is the SECOND time I’ve had to see a psychologist to prove to my doctors I’m not just a stressed out female… So maybe now they’ll leave that alone?! An interesting fact, though: The psychologist knew what Rifampin was because he has two other patients who have been off and on antibiotics for Lyme and coinfections. You know, in this state where I live, where Lyme supposedly doesn’t exist? Just like the two patients my infectious disease doctor treated here? Yeah…

The area of my brain with the lesion is the Pons, which is part of the Brain Stem. All of your brain is important but that.. is.. very important. It’s the part that allows communication between the your brain and spinal cord, i.e., any signal your body gets or receives has to pass through it. Wiki says the Pons is about 2.5cm in length, so the fact that this “spot” I have is 1cm itself… A little frightening, that. It could have been caused by a particularly bad Migraine, but.. then why is it getting any bigger at all? Or if it’s demyelination caused by an infection, it’ll just be there forever. If it’s actually a Lyme cyst, it could disappear with antibiotic treatment, because it’s not nerve damage as much as it is a bundle of bacteria that appears as a lesion on an MRI. The worse case scenario is that these infections have triggered multiple sclerosis (MS), which Lyme, Bartonella, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are all capable of doing. And truth be told, the spot is more MS-like than Lyme-like. But. That scenario seems less likely, because MS doesn’t improve on antibiotics; I did.

As for the valve regurgitation… Well, I guess I expected as much. MVR generally gets worse over time, so it’s a little scary that it went from mild to moderate in just a year and a half, but… I guess when you look at what’s currently happening, and also with me being unable to treat the bartonella for almost a year (bartonella really likes the heart), it’s not that shocking. As if having M.E. wasn’t enough of a predisposition to heart failure, this does not help.

I’ve been working on this entry since Tuesday, so maybe in another few days (hopefully sooner!) I’ll try to make a post about what’s happening now. Until then, wish me luck with my antibiotic pulse, that it’s enough to keep me from the ER! I’m sure they’re very sick of me by now!

a rainbow at night

[Note, Nov 17, 2011: Further developments as to what happened can be found in subsequent posts, or by clicking the “pings” (posts where I referenced this one) below. These attacks were eventually proven to be neuropathy of my vagus nerve.]