New month, new progress, new test results

Spider Web, Rockefeller Forest, Humboldt Redwoods State Park © a rainbow at night

I’m pleased to be writing that I’ve made many great strides in getting my life back on track over the last three weeks. I logged back into my Twitter account and began using it on a daily basis; participated in two “spoonie” meet-ups online, #SpoonieChat and #SCTweetFlix; am replying to some messages when my brain has readily-available thoughts on the topic; and have joined a sort-of spoonie/artist/support group/project, even if I only participate sporadically.

Other things haven’t changed so much. I have yet to open any e-mails, or even log-in to my account for that matter. And I’m still staying far away from the M.E. community and the Lyme disease community, i.e. anything to do with that style of advocacy or activism. I momentarily tried to look at how the Lyme community was fairing, but immediately saw memorial posts concerning a young woman’s suicide. I’m not psychologically prepared for that constant exposure again, as I think I’ve made very clear. I stepped into the M.E. community to test the waters, also, but that was equally a mistake.

Mostly, I’ve gained back a lot of personal power that I didn’t even realize I’d given away. I’m on a journey here, and no one has the right to tell me how far along, or at what point on their map, I should be at. I don’t even have the right to talk to myself that way. I’m also under somewhat less stress now that I’m no longer shouldering my family members through their own recoveries. I still have a lot of trouble communicating, particularly in person, but since being on antibiotics for two weeks, that has temporarily improved. In hindsight I wonder if all my temporary improvements in brain function were due to the antibiotics, or just this time.

Now that I’ve moved into the part of grieving where you can look back and see why you handled things the way you did, I realize that I didn’t do much honouring of the choices I made, even the unconscious ones. But I now have the opportunity to re-frame and integrate the experience, so I’m going to take it.

I honour the parts of myself that knew not make my drama everyone else’s responsibility. I honour the parts of myself that recognized I had to heal a little bit more first, or all my interactions would be coloured by distortions too thick to see through. I honour the parts of myself that knew I needed merciful stillness, not ruthless force, and I honour that which gave me permission to listen.

Whereas part of me assumed I’d be swallowed by deep regret over the time lost, friendships lost, and God knows what else once I finally got free, I very surprisingly feel gratitude. 

I’m grateful for even having had the opportunity to take that “time off” to recover. I’m grateful for all the fights I didn’t provoke out of my own pain, had I forced myself to socialize. (Although, in the state I was in, I can’t imagine I’d have been able to find the words for any argument, honestly.) I’m grateful for me being able to realize I was the one who was overburdened with grief, and that it wasn’t anyone else’s job to revolve their life around me to fix that. (Not that I would even do that, but I recently witnessed someone who was blaming an entire community for their own emotional suffering, to the point that they thought the community had to change to make them happy. It did make me think, “Damn, I may have trouble being around certain groups, but at least I realize this is a personal issue, and that no one owes me an apology for living their own life the way they’re entitled to do.”)

I’m still terrified that the day will come when I’ll wake up and everything will have changed without me knowing why, that I won’t be able to tolerate anything again, or another severe trigger or actual lived trauma will set me back months or years. Just as I fear that the next bad headache will be the start of another relapse. Just as someone with depression fears that that one day of sadness will turn into six months of crushing despair. The difference now is.. well, probably something neurological, as the antibiotics have shown me. But I’m no longer allowing that fear to stop me from participating in whatever ways I can choose to, while I’m able.

Thanks to meditation, I have long since found the place in myself that knows It’s not the feelings, nor the thoughts, but the One who is experiencing those things. That place in me is always still, no matter what. To be simplistic, that’s what we call “the lion’s roar” in Buddhism, the ultimate truth within us that causes all other noise to fall away, like beings from all four directions bow away from the sound of the mighty lion’s roar claiming its territory.

From my current perspective, I have two options. I can listen to the survivor’s guilt, the irrational shame, and ruin my life (or at least this stretch of it). Definitely allowed, but not recommended, and clearly unbeneficial. Or, while I’m healing, I can remember that the end point of treatment will be to eventually FEEL that those thoughts are untrue, as well as know that. But the way I see it, there’s zero reason for me to wait until I FEEL those things aren’t true before I start living better. I know the chaos is full of lies, regardless. I know they’re lies now, and I’ll know they’re lies after recovery. Why do I have to wait for my ever-so-fickle feelings to catch up with what I already know, when I can just start living that way, right now? Yes, I’ll still have the thoughts, and they’ll still feel true for the time being, but I know they’re not, and I’d rather have the thoughts while I’m attempting to put my life back together, than have the thoughts while I’m holed up in my house for months.

I can’t give away my power to change the things I can. Because this is how I gave away my strength, by forgetting the immensity of power lying within all the tiny, monotonous choices that actually make or break your life. When I saw myself writing in my last post that I’d started to self-perpetuate my suffering, I knew I had to change that, or it was not going to end well. It also gave me a little hope, because I finally saw a piece of this that was within my control. If there was something I was doing to make this worse, then that also meant there was something I could do to make it better, simply by making a different choice. So I did, and here I am, three weeks later, continuing the momentum that sprung from me publishing that last post after six months of complete silence. That post took me three months. This one took me three weeks. That should say enough.

I don’t doubt I’ll still have “good days” and “bad days.” I’m trying to mitigate the chance of another “disappearance” a bit by taking Sundays offline, in hopes that, like so many other symptoms, if I just rest for a bit regardless of how I feel, I may be able to prevent whatever it is that builds up and make me cognitively shut down. I’m not sure if it’ll work, as I still have no idea what causes that, but I’m trying, damn it.


My latest tests results are equal parts disturbing and fantastic. Good news first?

My last homocysteine level before this one–which, in conjunction with a methylmalonic acid bloodtest, helps determines the rate of your folate metabolism, as well as suggest your risk of stroke and blood clots–was almost 30 (29.4). It’s supposed to be under 10.4 at the maximum, which means it was literally three times as high as it should ever be. Not great! Before my folate deficiency really kicked into gear, it was a lovely 7.2 umol/L. Well as of March, it’s all the way down to 15.8, which is basically only 5-points-above-normal. I’m almost cured of my folate deficiency!

Similarly, when I began treating these methylation problems, I could only tolerate a meager 100 mCg of methylfolate every 3 days. Now, I can tolerate a wonderful *500 mCg* every 3 days, and I’ll probably be able to increase that, soon. (As well as B12, of course, but I need more methylfolate than B12 at this point. I’ve found the hydroxo-cobalamin works much, much, much better than any other type, for me. So heads up: If you have the MTHFR C677TT homozygous polymorphisms, in addition to being homozygous–that is, having both/two copies–of COMT V158M, COMT H62H, *and* MAO-A R297R, like myself, you definitely want to take the hydroxocobalamin form of B12 and just save yourself the money and suffering of trying the other forms. Yes, it works even better than methyl-cobalamin.)

My cholesterol levels are also fantastic and I don’t know if I mentioned here yet, but I’m no longer pre-diabetic after a lot of dietery changes to help treat PCOS. No relapses, there, either!

Now the bad news, even though I don’t know how significant this is yet because I don’t see my neurologist until next week. First, I haven’t found the results of my intracranial pressure reading, or else they aren’t putting it on my online chart, so I don’t know what’s going on, there. I did however get the results of my spinal fluid analysis, and while my glucose is normal (I think?), my protein is normal (I think?), and my white blood cells appear normal (pretty sure?), there were two things that were present that were absolutely not supposed to be: Lots and lots of neutrophils, and blood. I know this could point to meningitis, but I’d like to think if that were the case, my doctor would have called, because that’s serious? So I hope there’s some other explanation. I refuse to Google anything and scare the hell out of myself over what could be going on. I’ll find out soon enough.

Also, while I know the results of my MRI must be in by now, they, too, have not yet posted to my online chart, so I don’t know the results. And honestly, with the wave of fear that overtook me while reading the CSF results, maybe that’s a good thing, in the event it does reveal something troubling.


The spinal tap itself went great, but the recovery was peculiar, and combined with missing my IVIG for two additional weeks, I was feeling beyond terrible. The most bizarre symptom was that I could not stand more than two minutes without severe shaking, all over; the kind of trembling that makes even your teeth chatter together. But I wasn’t cold! Luckily it resolved as soon as I lied back down, but that definitely wasn’t in the “this could happen afterwards” care sheet.

About a week after the lumbar puncture/several days after my eventual IVIG infusion, I had all the symptoms of fighting some type of infection, but without a fever. It was enough to make the room tilt and spin whenever I moved, have hot and cold sweats, cause ringing in my ears, and ultimately a severe headache toward the end, but no fever? Then I remembered, I rarely ever get a fever, no matter what is happening. So after several days of that hell, I said “screw it” and started my antibiotics. I immediately began feeling better, as quickly as the next day. I spoke with my immunologist and was given more antibiotics, and I moved my appointment up by two weeks so we can discuss why my immune system isn’t able to stop all these bizarre infections from happening these last six months, even with the IVIG. I’ll also ask about mold exposure, because that’s a real possibility that I haven’t forgotten about.

During all of that mess I spent most of my time tweeting to pass the hours, and in the process befriended some great people. I tend to feel like an outcast on Twitter the longer I’m on there, so we’ll see how long I last on there this time.

Until next time,

 

Kit

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IVIG Can Help Eradicate Bartonella Infection: My Success Thus Far.

[estimated reading time: 5 minutes 12 seconds] © a rainbow at night
After almost seven years with this infection, I think the bartonella may be gone for good.

If you recall from this previous post, I talked about how my health was either about to nosedive, or finally overthrow this infection thanks to the millions of antibodies I now get infused into my body every four weeks (certainly many of which are bartonella antibodies, since this bacteria is so common)… Guess which one happened? Continue reading “IVIG Can Help Eradicate Bartonella Infection: My Success Thus Far.”

A Very Special Way of Life

© a rainbow at night

I’m not used to living this kind of life. It’s so different from what I was supposed to have.

I barely see anyone. I barely go anywhere. I have no local friends and I think I’ve permanently lost my ability to drive. Disease puts me in bed an average of 23 hours per day, or at least to somewhere I can lean back and my legs are propped up to ensure proper circulation. When you tell people these things, they immediately pity you and interpret it as a bad kind of life, or a sad kind of life. “Oh you poor thing…” But I feel neither sad nor pitiful. And if you knew how much worse things actually could have been, you’d understand that only 23 hours in bed is a fucking miracle.

What I actually feel is peace, and I’m content and I’m happy and this fact truly boggles my mind.

This isn’t complacency. I know intimately the “lurking dangers” of this life and never have my head in the clouds–it’s not my style. Just last month I tried an herb that had once helped me for seven years; it failed. The month before I temporarily stopped a medicine I was on to see if it really makes a difference; it does. Two weeks ago I upped another med because one of my symptoms has worsened. And I’m only narrowly avoiding having to start a new neuropathy medication. Meanwhile, with much help I’ve planted spider lilies and a peach tree as investments in the future, bought a chaise lounge for my back porch so I can be outside more, have written and advocated a lot (obviously), put new wind-chimes directly outside my bedroom window, made reservations for a four-day beach vacation with my family next month before it gets too hot, because four days means at least one of those days I’ll be able to actually see the beach…

And I also have neurologist, immunologist, pain management, primary care, and endocrinologist appointments, although I struggle immensely with getting to them. As well as four semi-important blood tests to do that will probably never actually get done because I’m sorry, it is just not possible that someone as ill as myself can awaken and get up four hours earlier than usual without any caffeine, any pain medication, or any food, while having autonomic neuropathy, suicide-levels of pain, and pre-diabetes thanks to polycystic ovarian syndrome…

No, I’m not complacent.

There’s no wool over my eyes so that I can smile in the opposite direction. I’ve spent enough of my time in emergency rooms and hospitals and grieving the deaths of others from my same diseases that a bubble of blind optimism offers me no protection. Nor have I given my resignation to life, although I know I’ve exhausted my treatment options. Even if this was as good as it ever got, I’ve done enough living for many lifetimes, I think. And when the theatre season picks up next month I do have plans to go and to see. There’s a choir, another chamber orchestra, another beach, another ballet, all evenly spaced so that I’ll have time to rest then go then rest again to ensure my attendance at the next.

But for the past four months I’ve been what can only be described as a recluse, and I am so perfectly fine with it, that my peaceful surrender actually gave me pause. I had to stop and make sure nothing was wrong with me, that I wasn’t secretly anxious or scared or complacent or depressed or suffering a lack of motivation, because in my naiveté I thought those were the only reasons anyone could be in their own company for as long as I have and not crave “more.” As it turns out, my definition of “more” has changed dramatically, and being peaceful this consistently just isn’t something I’m used to, so I’ll sit with it for a while until I understand it fully, like Buddha under the Bodhi tree.

Most of my life has been spent in some form of chaos. Even growing up, I had no idea what it meant to relax, although ironically I never put it together that such a hellish environment was the very definition of stress, because that fact was so vehemently denied by the chaos-makers in favor of the illusion of happiness. It occurred to me later in life that this may be why I only accept authenticity and facing life head-on: I know what it feels like to be surrounded by fake emotions and others’ delusions instead of reality, and I never, ever want to live that way again. Life is much less frightening when you face it, trust me. There is safety in the truth.

Even though this is the kind of life that most would consider boring–especially my fellow Americans–I am so happy, and my quiet existence fills me with such joy. After living chaotically for such a long time, there’s now a sweet comfort in my predictable routines, an intense pleasure to be found in what most call mundane. The paradox is that I’m faced with allowing myself this happiness.

Confronted with better alternatives to old toxic patterns, there’s a bridge I must cross every time solutions seem too easy, too good to be true. I used to feel guilty for feeling calm amongst awful situations that were tearing other people apart, situations that in fact used to tear me apart, also. You think I just woke up like this one day? Oh, definitely not.

I still remember where I was the first time I noticed everyone around me was crumbling under a crisis, yet I, instead, was overcome with internal peace, finally aware that I could still not only feel calm, but I could actually be the calm, even as I acknowledged the situation’s dark potential. The difficult part was no longer finding that quiet internal space, but allowing myself to be as okay as I sincerely felt, and understanding it didn’t mean I was any less concerned than everyone else. Unfortunately, that’s how everyone else interpreted it even as I openly expressed otherwise, but you can’t please everyone.

I’m learning to be okay with this type of stability.

People do everything they do because they want to be happy, feel safe, have an impact on the world around them, and live in harmony. I used to think there was only one way for me to get there.

Thank goodness I was wrong.

a rainbow at night


See also:

“Of Course It’s Easy For YOU” Syndrome

© a rainbow at night

“Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.” (Oscar Wilde)

So how do you respond when someone looks at something you’ve worked your ass off for and thinks you only got it because the odds just fell into your favor? How do you process this inherent invalidation of all your struggles, and what does it mean about the person who said it?

When I look back at all that I’ve done over the past year, it really blows my mind. And I did it all because I first made the choice to live and enjoy within the confines of my circumstances, just like I did last year. I set in my mind what I wanted, made whatever arrangements I could on my own to help them manifest, and let the Universe work out the rest based on what I needed to experience.

If I wasn’t supposed to have something yet (or at all), well it wouldn’t have been from my lack of trying.

None of it would have happened if I just blindly accepted the identity of “sick person” that most family members and even doctors wanted to give me; that for too many years I gave to myself, as well. With this identity comes the belief that you must wait until you’re better before you can enjoy your life, whereas nothing could be further from the truth, especially when it comes to long-term or chronic illness.

But in general people don’t want to hear that. Some don’t even want to hear about all that I was able to experience (although I’ve already written about my past endeavors-while-sick), and that’s okay. I know the things I lived, I don’t need further documentation. And because it involved a lot of travel, I don’t imagine they’d be all that interesting to anyone else, anyway, in the same way slide shows of your vacations need to be ambushed upon unsuspecting house guests if you plan to share them.

I might be a little biased on this next part, due to people continuously asking my advice on how to get something I have (emotional freedom and the like, usually), yet being very unwilling to actually do anything that’s even mildly uncomfortable in order to get it. Then they turn around and play this card:

They wish something in their life was as “easy” as I “seem to have it.”

More than a few people have said that to me within a week’s time, and I couldn’t help but laugh.

Because nothing–absolutely nothing–has come easy for me. No one comes to acquire the traits that make life’s difficulties seem “easy,” because life actually WAS easy. No, they arise from having had so much hardship that you eventually learned coping mechanisms to deal with them. Even still, what one might perceive as my ease of living is actually my choice to experience it as such, and I’ve crossed over mountains to get to this place from where I was, because I was not raised to be peaceful. (Please read that. Okay?)

But people only hear what they want to hear, and until they’re ready to change, they resort to, Of course YOU did it, you [insert excuse for why it’s easier for everyone else besides them]. Or else they want to be spoon-fed the exact steps they need to take, as to (1) only do and invest as much work as is necessary and (2) eliminate the natural consequence of following less-strictly-defined steps: fear and anxiety.

This “Of Course It’s Easy For You” Syndrome is also troubling because it’s an unconscious confession of (more fear) self-sabotage. This is inventing excuses for why you can’t have what someone else has, to convince yourself not to even try. It’s giving yourself an “out” based on an external factor out of your control, or something internal you perceive yourself not to have but which someone else does, helping substantiate your belief that the situation is out of your hands.

But if you want things to be easier, it doesn’t start with changing your circumstances, because you can only manipulate your circumstances to the extent that you realize what is really yours to control.

And that all starts with manipulating you.

Society tells us from the day we step outside that your life is supposed to be about getting from point A to point B, and to pass your days filling in the rest with your to-do list of how to accomplish that. But that’s incorrect. Our lives aren’t defined by only the big decisions, goals, and occurrences. However much impact they have on the rest of our days, those major game-changers are few and far between.

Life is mostly made up of all the little moments you encounter between those perceived checkpoints. It’s all the smaller things you do day in, and day out, that make up the most of your life and help determine your happiness. You can have a radically different life without changing a single external circumstance, because the only common denominator in your entire existence, is You. In other words:

When it comes to enjoying your life and finding peace, it has nothing to do with someone else having something you don’t.

And I guess that’s why it doesn’t matter too much to me anymore to explain all that I’ve been able to do, even while sick. Although reaching those goals was inexplicably amazing, it’s the process of living and thinking that helped me manifest them at all, which holds the most value in the long run. And that’s the part I really want to share with this blog.

a rainbow at night

How Wrong I Was: My One-Year Anniversary Without Treatment

Working on my latest piece; if this doesn’t say “artist’s desk” I’m not sure what does…

I had an experience while having coffee with the squirrels the other day. Well, sitting on the back porch, but same difference.

I was watching all of the animals, listening to the birds, and feeling the gentle breeze. A chickadee–my favourite–was chirping in the midst. Any other day this would’ve been a normal backyard, but at that moment, it was a sanctuary.

There was so much out there: I counted at least ten species of animal within twenty minutes. And as everything just went along with its life, I was suddenly very overwhelmed with the knowledge that life always goes on. It’s humbling and frightening and comforting all at once.

When I opened the door to step outside, everything had paused to look at me. I sat down quietly and started sipping my coffee. Everything went back to its business of finding dinner and fluttering about. Their acceptance reminded me that I was also part of it all—I belonged there.

I glanced over at my house and the walls that separated my quarters from their quarters. Theirs, a tree; mine, a room and bed made from the tree. There were walls to “separate” me from the outside air and ground, protect me from danger and the harsher elements just like any other creature, but all that really separated me from those squirrels and birds and butterflies were four inches of material that the earth provided me in the first place. The stars are always above us even if all we see is a ceiling. We are part of everything. And the earth made room for me to exist, right here.

A few nights earlier, I did that thing where you open your closet to get something and end up distracted by everything else you find. I snatched the sweaters and shoes I bought earlier in the year, for Autumn. Put on a hat. All layered on top of the dress I wore that day. Looking into my full-length mirror, witnessing how perfectly it all went together, I had another “moment.”

I was overcome by how blessed I felt to be experiencing all of this; all of this. Feeling okay with life, even if it is scary; sharing my days with the love of my life; being together during our favourite season; being close to my remaining family; miraculously having funds to take care of everything I need AND want; and being able to wear clothes that represented me, that I picked out instead of clothes discarded from others’ closets.

It happened in a flash of thought, but looking at my reflection, it was as if the clothes were symbolic of all the pieces of my life I’d changed and chosen over this year, hoping they’d eventually, somehow come together in the future; and the perfect way the scattered items “fit,” a reminder of how my life has worked out. All my preparation–in wardrobe choices and life choices–had proved to be more perfect than I could have ever imagined. I had a distinct sense of “I made it.”

My legs do give out more and more lately, but considering how quickly things progressed the previous times treatment failed, I honestly didn’t know if I’d even be walking at all, much less this well, after a year. I didn’t think any of this would have been possible… How wrong I was.

How wrong I was.


Today marks the first anniversary of my relapse in 2012, and the day I stopped treatment. Things aren’t going how I thought they would.

I did not experience remission from M.E. after ten years of living with it, like many do. I did not cure the bartonellosis. My pain continues to expand instead of resolve. I still have mycoplasmosis and I’m not “beating Lyme disease” and I won’t be going into any other treatment programs with the motive of being 100% cured, of any disease.

But I look at who I am now and who I am still becoming, and the people in my life, and the way I experience life, and I wonder if things could possible be any better for someone in this situation. I really don’t think they could.

a rainbow at night

“These are a few of my favourite things…”

English: Sunflowers in Fargo, North Dakota. Es...
Sunflowers in Fargo, North Dakota

I have definitely been doing a lot of LIVING the past several months. I’d call all of my New Year resolution goals a success so far, with the exception of writing in my daily journal which I did for a month then found redundant, so I let it go. I’ve been enjoying a monthly audiobook, I’ve continued my studies in French, I’ve been leaving the house with NO intentions of anything health-related–movies, performances, cafés–and delved into my art, photography, writing…

“Venture out, jump in, and be a part of this great and fascinating universe in which you find yourself.”

“On this day, in this place, as you are, with what you have, let go of the fears, worries and doubts, and richly, joyfully live.”

Ralph Marston

You know in those fiction novels, or even some movies, where the character randomly starts naming all these things they like, usually as an attempt to describe who they are…? Or sometimes, depending on the level of the story, it’s about personal reflection. Well I’ve been doing that, lately. In “real life.”

“There are many amazing things you will discover, and their only value is whatever is realized in the moment you find them.”

Matt Kahn

Like, I think sunflowers are amazing. And I really like jellyfish. And leafy seadragons. And cake, and chickadee songs, and floral prints and vanilla-flavoured beverages…

It feels kind of invigorating, to think that even now, I’m still.. becoming something. I’m still becoming.

a rainbow at night

“All is well, and has been, and will be.”

[ estimated reading time: 6 minutes 26 seconds ]
This year I learned that looking forward is still looking away from the present.

Even looking forward positively, is still not living in the moment, not looking at Now. You can’t get caught up in all the things you’re looking forward to having or being, because you’ll miss the opportunities of the only life you have: The one you’re already living. It’s good to have goals! But, for some things, it is not the end result that is most important.

I’ve been noticing that now it no longer serves me to see this “attack on Lyme” as a battle to be won, where anything other than eliminating the bugs is a failure. That cannot be my focus anymore. It’s not my focus in dealing with M.E., and it cannot be my focus for dealing with neuroborreliosis, either.

I used to be okay with waking up every morning knowing I had a war to fight. Because for a while, it really was a war–beat the bartonella, do whatever I had to in order to get it under control, or it would very quickly be the end of me. And like a patient recovering from chemo and radiation, my body paid the price of all the medications needed to do that. But at least I’m still alive. I did it! I just can’t “win the war” against the Lyme that way…

I’ve had to stare reality in the face for the past several months and recognize that I may not “win the war” at all, at least not in normal standards. I have to redefine what “winning” means to me.

 

This is not a disease I can conquer forever with a few rounds of treatment. With my immunodeficiencies, very neurologically-oriented six-years untreated strain of infection, ten-year history of M.E., and twelve-year history of just trying to stay stable every single day, my body has been through a lot. So, to be perfectly honest, I may never get rid of Lyme disease. But that doesn’t mean I’m going to just let it take over.

I just can’t look at it like my goal is to “win,” where winning means nothing short of slowly eradicating the infection, because truly, why would I do that to myself? Why would I invest all my energy and focus into something that, for all intents and purposes, probably isn’t even possible anymore? Why would I do that, when there is another way, a way that brings me peace and also allows me to treat my disease?

Because that’s what I have left–I have a treatment, not a cure.

I used to think it could be a cure, because for most everyone, it is. Even if they find it late in the game, many will just have a longer battle to fight, but they can “win.” They can get IV antibiotics if their case is in their CNS, or they can at least take loads of oral antibiotics to make sure it dies and stays dead. That is possible, even for many with coinfections. But me?

Even if I could get IV antibiotics, they would probably kill me in the process; even oral antibiotics are almost impossible. (Almost.)

Maybe if Life had shown me the infection earlier, we could have cured it, even with all my additional factors. But that didn’t happen. I’m only thankful It brought information my way when It did. I am glad bartonella and mycoplasma happened, to alert me that I had something else going on that was about to irreversibly damage my body. I’m glad I am someone who pays attentions to those things, or I wouldn’t be here right now. But that’s the thing: I am still here, and I still have a life to live…even if it’s not the one I imagined!

 

I naively thought that when you go through something like this once (getting diagnosed with M.E.), twice (getting diagnosed with Lyme disease), it might be over, the whole “massive illnesses that alter the course of the rest of your life” thing…

But that wasn’t true, either. It took me almost a year to come to terms with the Lyme disease diagnosis, because inside I knew if someone like me had it, it’d probably be with me for life. I didn’t want to accept that. Then once I started getting better for a while I thought, okay, it’s not too late for me, there is still hope! And back then there was hope because it’d only gone untreated three years! And even now, I haven’t given up… But like I said, looking forward is still not looking at what you already have.

Someone shared with me a Žižek quote that pretty much sums up everything:

“Our desires are artificial, we have to be taught to desire.”

I was taught to desire an eradication and to accept nothing less. I was taught that if I did certain things, then things would work out, go the way I wanted. I fixed my focus on “I can get better again if…” and put in my head a bunch of things that could happen, should happen, that would allow me to have the life I wanted. And I went after them, like anyone would…

  • “If I eradicate the bartonella…” I did, and my reward is Life.
  • “Then I can get the Lyme disease under control…” But I cannot handle the treatments anymore.
  • “Because a lot of people with M.E. experience another remission after about ten years.” But I relapsed, instead. Twice.

 

Things didn’t go how I planned, how my doctor planned, how my friends and family planned. But my life is not over. I just have to come to terms with my new reality–a life with Myalgic encephalomyelitis, and a life with chronic relapse-remitting Lyme disease. I may eventually get a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis at this rate, but at the very least, that disease does not face the same mockery by the medical establishments (or insurance companies).

I have fought well and hard for the health I do have, and I will continue to fight to keep it, but I will not, cannot, see this as a “daily battle to win the war,” anymore. It is not. Now, it is better for me to wake up and think about my other goals, and have “treating Lyme” as just another part of my daily regimen, a part of my life that will never change just like having M.E. will never change. I cannot give away all of my spoons to treating a disease that will still be around after the fact.

“You are here, in this moment, able to do so much that’s worthwhile and fulfilling.

“Your life has real purpose, and when you let go of the superficial concerns, you can feel and know and follow that purpose. Life is beautiful, and by taking the time to look closely, you can see the beauty everywhere.

“All is well, and has been, and will be. The genuine goodness within you refuses to be compromised by any of the world’s ups and downs.”

“Go ahead, step forward, and live with total, solid confidence. Let every thought and action be filled with positive purpose and the knowledge that ultimately, you cannot fail.” (Ralph Marston)

My disclaimer: If you’re a fellow patient of Lyme, I beg of you not to take my own need for expression and use it to convince yourself that there’s no hope for you. You and your doctor can only figure out what’s best for you after a careful analysis of your individual situation. I’m not even saying there isn’t hope for me, but I’m fully aware of how some people think and thus how everything here might come across… It actually stops me from writing sometimes, but I don’t want that anymore.

Expect to see more of my uncensored thoughts in 2013, and stay strong, no matter what decisions you get to make. :)

a rainbow at night