A Very Special Way of Life

I’m not used to living this kind of life… It’s so different from what I was supposed to have, so different from what I was used to…

I barely see anyone. I barely go anywhere. I have no local friends and I think I’ve permanently lost my ability to drive. Disease puts me in bed an average of 23 hours per day, or at least to some area where I can lean back and my legs are propped up to ensure proper circulation. When you tell people these things, they immediately pity you and interpret it as a bad kind of life, or a sad kind of life, “oh you poor thing…” But I feel neither sad nor pitiful. And if you knew how much worse things could have gone, you’d understand that only 23 hours in bed is a fucking miracle.

What I actually feel is peace, and I’m content and I’m happy and this fact truly boggles my mind.

This isn’t complacency. I know intimately the “lurking dangers” of this life and never have my head in the clouds–it’s not my style. Just last month I tried an herb that had once helped me for seven years; it failed. The month before I temporarily stopped a medicine I was on to see if it really makes a difference; it does. Two weeks ago I upped another med because one of my symptoms has worsened. And I’m only narrowly avoiding having to start a new neuropathy medication. Meanwhile, with much help I’ve planted spider lilies and a peach tree as investments in the future, bought a chaise lounge for my back porch so I can be outside more, have written and advocated a lot (obviously), put new wind-chimes directly outside my bedroom window, made reservations for a four-day beach vacation with my family next month before it gets too hot, because four days means at least one of those days I’ll be able to actually see the beach…

And I also have neurologist, immunologist, pain management, primary care, and endocrinologist appointments, although I struggle immensely with getting to them. As well as four semi-important blood tests to do that will probably never actually get done because I’m sorry, it is just not possible that someone as ill as myself can awaken and get up four hours earlier than usual without any caffeine, any pain medication, or any food, when they have autonomic neuropathy, suicidal-level pain, and are pre-diabetic… No, I’m not complacent.

There’s no wool over my eyes so that I can smile in the opposite direction. I’ve spent enough of my time in emergency rooms and hospitals and grieving the deaths of others from my same diseases that a bubble of blind optimism offers me no protection. Nor have I given in my resignation to life, although I know I’ve exhausted my treatment options. Even if this was as good as it ever got, I’ve done enough living for many lifetimes, I think. And when the theatre season picks up next month I do have plans to go and to see. There’s a choir, another chamber orchestra, another beach, another ballet, all evenly spaced so that I’ll have time to rest then go then rest again to ensure my attendance at the next…

But for the past four months I’ve been what can only be described as a recluse, and I am so perfectly fine with it, that my peaceful surrender instead gave me pause. I had to stop and make sure nothing was wrong with me, that I wasn’t secretly anxious or scared or complacent or depressed or suffering a lack of motivation, because in my naiveté I thought those were the only reasons anyone could be in their own company for as long as I have and not crave “more.” As it turns out, my definition of “more” has changed dramatically, and this being consistently peaceful just isn’t something I’m used to, so I’ll sit with it for a while until I understand it fully, like Buddha under the Bodhi tree.

Most of my life has been spent in some form of chaos. Even growing up, I had no idea what it meant to relax, although I never identified that hellish environment as being stressful because that fact was so vehemently denied in favor of the illusion of happiness. It occurred to me later in life this may be why I only accept authenticity and facing life head-on: I know what it feels like to be surrounded by fake emotions and others’ delusions instead of reality, and I never, ever want to live that way again. Life is much less frightening when you face it, trust me.

Even though this is the kind of life that most would consider boring–especially my fellow Americans–I am so happy, and my quiet existence fills me with such joy. I lived chaotically for such a long time that there’s now a sweet comfort in my predictable routines, an intense pleasure to be found in what most call mundane. The paradox is that I’m faced with allowing myself this happiness.

Confronted with better alternatives to old toxic patterns, there’s a bridge I must cross when the solutions seem too easy, too good to be true. I used to feel guilty for feeling calm amongst awful situations that were tearing other people apart, situations that in fact used to tear me apart, also. You think I just woke up like this one day? Oh, definitely not.

I still remember where I was the first time I noticed everyone around me was crumbling under a crisis, yet I was instead overcome with internal peace, knowing that I could not only still feel calm, but I could actually BE the calm, even as I acknowledged the situation’s potential for stress. The difficult part was not finding that quiet internal space, but allowing myself to be as okay as I sincerely felt, while understanding it didn’t mean I was any less concerned than everyone else…although that’s how everyone else interpreted it, unfortunately, even as I openly expressed otherwise.

I’m learning to be okay with this type of stability.

People do everything they do because they want to be happy, feel safe, have an impact on the world around them, and live in harmony. I used to think there was only one way for me to get there.

Thank goodness I was wrong.

a rainbow at night

The Parts of ME: What If It Were You?

Throughout this series, but especially in this part, I only ask you to remain open. But what does that mean? To quote Thich Nhat Hanh: “Usually when we hear or read something new, we just compare it to our own ideas. If it is the same, we accept it and say it is correct; if it is not, we say it is incorrect. In either case, we learn nothing.” So by being open, we agree to allow the information in and integrate it with the use of our intelligence instead of thoughtless reaction. Even though we’re all thoughtless sometimes…

Before we begin, I have yet another update on my stance with ME Advocacy. While I still do not support their campaign because I disagree with almost everything they’ve done, in my last post I wrote some harsh criticisms which I incorrectly stated as facts instead of my opinions. That was wrong, and I’ve updated the post accordingly. When I reread it I was actually shocked: I have the distinct memory of saying to myself while editing for publication, ‘No, I can’t state my opinions as fact, I have to change this,’ because (1) I am very much against this, (2) I hate when others do it, and (3) I never want to be “that person.” And yet, there I was. Because of that memory, I actually wonder if I inserted a pre-edited version of that paragraph instead of my final draft; my last hope that I hadn’t really been that careless. But, I was, and I’m sorry that quality of work made it to the public, because I try to hold myself to a standard of wise speech, which I fell short of this time. I know I won’t always be able to prevent mistakes, but in the future I’ll be more mindful when attempting to meet a deadline, especially as this site gains more notoriety. (Always a learning experience!)

Okay. Let’s move on to the flesh of this post. What if it were you?


 So much of the M.E. vs CFS debate is clearly a matter of perspective.

If you’ve been offhandedly diagnosed with myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E.) or diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), there’s a good chance you tend to to speak with those in the community who also have your symptoms. It’s easy to reinforce your own version of things when there’s nothing to challenge it; if everyone around is just like you, who wouldn’t feel right? You generally support research efforts into “ME/CFS” because you feel confident this research will actually help you and others, so your main advocacy cry is “More funding!”

But hold on…

Would you still feel just as confident that research being done on your illness was ACTUALLY being done on YOUR illness if all the people you talked to didn’t have your symptoms? Or would that make you wonder which disease researchers were ACTUALLY studying/what group of people the studies were ACTUALLY helping?

To quote a friend: “Before you jump on the bandwagon and decide that this is just a silly name war, consider the implications.”

What if everyone you talked to with your illness said they actually weren’t very fatigued and could exercise five times a week? Your thoughts are probably the same as what an M.E. patient thinks when we hear of someone getting an M.E. diagnosis (1) without getting sick after a virus, (2) without having any neurological damage, and (3) without experiencing any exertion-induced muscular fatigue and/or pain (with subsequent exertion-induced paralysis): How can they have a disease without any of the core manifestations of that disease?

Or, what if your version of CFS were suddenly renamed to “idiopathic rash disease” just because a lot of people with CFS get rashes? Over time, your disabling fatigue, post-exertional malaise, pain–none of it is required anymore for this new diagnosis, BUT! It’s now called “CFS/Idiopathic Rash Disease.” You might ask, but Kit, if none of the symptoms for CFS are required for Idiopathic Rash Disease, why on earth was it ever combined? Well, because the Idiopathic Rash group advocated so strongly that the illnesses should be combined–after all, even though they have little in common now, it did originally start as a type of CFS, right?–that it ultimately becomes known internationally as “CFS/Idiopathic Rash Disease.” This looked like a good thing to the thousands of people who had no idea what “real CFS” was, so there wasn’t much protest from society at large…even though this combination further muddled everything (especially research!) by combining what used to be called CFS–your disabling fatigue, pain, sleep problems, etc.–with a new category that the government invented to study unexplained rashes.

Meanwhile, CFS advocates are feeling increasingly helpless that the majority of their patient group is being replaced with something that only barely describes their condition–your condition!–pleading, “This rash disease used to be called CFS, because we all had excruciating fatigue and post-exertional sickness! What is left to study our illness if all research is going towards unexplained rashes that could be caused by a million different things? Some of us are dying!” Incredulously, the people diagnosed with Idiopathic Rash Disease truly think they have the same illness as you, as classic CFS, even though they didn’t need nor have any of your symptoms for diagnosis.

How do you suppose research on “CFS/Idiopathic Rash Disease” will actually study people like you, now, when classic CFS is being buried year after year by more and more people who just want answers to their rashes…? And truly, they deserve those answers, don’t you think? You wouldn’t want to deny them their own research just because the government made a nonsensical decision to replace CFS with a focus on this new rash disease. But nonetheless, both groups are synonymous with each other, now, and across the globe people are starting to forget that CFS was once its own category, with its own symptoms that had nothing to do with idiopathic rash.

One day, you realize thirty years have passed, and all the new patients being diagnosed with “CFS/Idiopathic Rash Disease” don’t even remember when CFS was its own illness anymore. Funny thing is, everyone is quick to remember the part where Idiopathic Rash Disease started because of some CFS patients with rashes, but no one seems to remember that that’s where their similarities ended. You’re no closer to science figuring out what’s wrong with you, nor is anyone with Idiopathic Rash Disease any closer to finding out what’s really causing their symptoms. In fact, these new, uninformed patients are now yelling at you, an original CFS patient, claiming none of this even matters. Why are you so caught up on a name? Idiopathic Rash Disease is the same as CFS because it was created from CFS patients. And if no one likes the name of “idiopathic rash disease” maybe we’ll just petition the government to call this “CFS” again–that would help everyone, right, if we just took all these random rash patients and said they have CFS?

Hopefully that scenario upset you. Hopefully it made your head spin to think that anything so nonsensical and unscientific could ever happen. Maybe you’re even outraged and ready to end this hypothetical situation…

But this is exactly what happened to people with M.E. when CFS was invented. CFS was created to study “chronic fatigue of undetermined cause” and as the years have passed it’s morphed into a hybrid that still doesn’t describe any one condition. And it is not the fault of the CFS patient (or “ME/CFS” patient) that they’ve been so misinformed by the people they thought they could trust, or that those in power leave out major details when discussing ME and CFS history. But if it were you, if you REALLY WERE being replaced and forgotten in favor of a new illness that doesn’t describe your disease, wouldn’t you want someone to speak up for you?

So why do people look at us like we’re doing something wrong by reminding everyone that chronic fatigue syndrome is not M.E.? I quote again: “Before you jump on the bandwagon and decide that this is just a silly name war, consider the implications.”


Luckily, the illness defined by Ramsay et al. called myalgic encephalomyelitis is not that easy to get. But

  • we all got sick after a virus;
  • we all have measurable neurological damage; and
  • we all have a very distinctive muscle pathology, a sign that was described by multiple doctors who all came to the same conclusion without having any communication with each other: “Muscle fatigability, whereby, even after a minor degree of physical effort, three, four or five days, or longer, elapse before full muscle power is restored and constitutes the sheet anchor of diagnosis. Without it I would be unwilling to diagnose a patient as suffering from ME, but it is most important to stress the fact that cases of ME of mild or even moderate severity may have normal muscle power in a remission. In such cases, tests for muscle power should be repeated after exercise.” (Quote by Dr. Melvin Ramsay, although all M.E. experts explain this same phenomenon in their own way)

And finally, we were all diagnosed with M.E., but now we’re not being studied at all unless we piggyback into research with other illnesses. People with classic M.E. have been forgotten, and this has been worsened irrevocably by (1) fighting to have ME and CFS combined into “ME/CFS” without fully understanding what this does to us or how much it further harms everyone, as well as (2) efforts to rename CFS to M.E., which is entirely illogical. Several recent polls have revealed that patients prefer the name M.E. because it sounds more legitimate, even though most people diagnosed with CFS–and even people diagnosed with ME without thorough inspection–do not actually have ME.  And many patients with classic M.E. are so desperate they’re willing to rename CFS (and SEID) to “M.E.” without also changing the diagnostic criteria to actually reflect M.E.: This is not 1988, the CFS bucket no longer contains just people with my illness, or just people with your illness, but dozens of misdiagnoses combined under one label. So why on earth would we rename this condition to another condition that it isn’t? I think the only thing these poll results prove is just how misinformed our community really is about our history, which is a major reason I’m writing this series. (I also left a comment to that post.)


So what’s my point in all this?

People who do get this infectious neurological disease–classic M.E. as it was defined before being unduly influenced by CFS and psychiatry–deserve to be and should be studied on their own, NOT forced to share the diagnosis and subsequently the research opportunities with other illnesses, all because a mistake was made thirty years ago. It’s not about the name itself as much as what the name used to stand for: I don’t care if we start calling it Egg Disease, as long as it actually describes and studies us, and only us! Until we consistently group people like us together and study them, we will never know what is causing this illness or how to relieve the suffering of people who move into the chronic, incurable, relapse-remitting or progressive forms.

All of these outbreaks didn’t just just magically stop occurring when CFS was invented. M.E. outbreaks are still happening even though the epidemics are no longer being recorded or studied. Cort Johnson wrote that Dr. Byron Hyde mentioned having “reports of over sixty” M.E. outbreaks from just 1988 to 2003, which were “no longer figured in the literature” and “were not given any mention in the ICC” (International Consensus Criteria). This should horrify people, and yet…

So please tell me how people with classic M.E. are supposed to be okay with what’s happened. Please tell me how research on people who became gradually fatigued is supposed to help people who all got sick after a virus. Please tell me how research on people who are chronically fatigued is supposed to help people whose breathing muscles are so weak many must sleep propped up or suffer from hypoxia; who exhibit clinical heart failure after exertion; who can’t write without risking arm paralysis; who can’t get up from the lying position using their back and abdominal muscles (which used to be such a prominent feature at the onset it was almost a diagnostic sign). And please tell me how giving people a diagnosis of M.E. without requiring the core manifestations, without checking for bacterial infections like Lyme disease, or even without giving them an MRI, is supposed to result in anything other than continued disaster (for us and the integrity of research).

If you want to pretend none of this is true–that you didn’t read any of this, that infectious M.E. doesn’t still exist–you won’t run into any shortages of other places to go. There are countless patient groups for you to join that will say none of this matters because it’s not THEIR symptoms that are being ignored. You’ll still have those options… But I ask you to contemplate having your disabling condition replaced by idiopathic rashes, like we’ve had our disabling condition replaced by idiopathic fatigue. After reading this, you are aware that we still exist and that M.E. epidemics are still quietly occurring. Don’t forget us.

All of that said, I do think we’re too far gone to erase CFS or SEID, despite some claiming it is the only way forward. I do not think it is the only way, nor do I think it’s even plausible. In reality, while we’re fighting for change, people are going to be misdiagnosed with CFS (and SEID, if it’s implemented)…including thousands of people with M.E. This is terrible because it diagnoses us too late for intervention, doesn’t give us the treatment advice we need in time, and doesn’t allow us to partake in research that applies specifically to us. But not all “ME/CFS” research has been fruitless. Some researchers select specific subsets–such as focusing on post-viral acute-onset cases while at the same time selecting patients who meet the Canadian Consensus Criteria, the only criteria that specifically require muscle fatigue–and we do get somewhere. That is exactly how the recent “robust evidence” paper selected their patient group, and it most likely included many patients with actual M.E. because of it–to that effect, the results actually match historical knowledge about ME in several ways. I also personally hypothesize that if SEID inadvertently catches a greater number of people with M.E., coupled with increased funding, this may one day force science to separate us into our own group yet again, if we repeatedly show abnormalities that others CFS subsets cannot reproduce… But all that is for a later post.


Lastly, consider this:

There are thousands of rare diseases that will never be studied or researched. I think sometimes we get lost in the idea that it’s others’ jobs to fix us instead of our job to continue living our lives as best as possible. It’s wonderful that we’ve created a system to study diseases and relieve suffering, even if those systems get it very, very wrong sometimes. But M.E. has existed for centuries and will continue to do so, no matter what people call it, no matter how many people try to say we don’t exist. So listen to me:

I believe you. I’m sorry we’re on this particular journey together. And it is my most sincere wish that you not only discover the truth about this disease to the extent that it will help you (the books by our experts are some of the most validating things you’ll ever read) but that you’ll also do everything you can to increase your quality of life while you’re here, because you do matter. Dare to find enjoyment in your life, even if it’s difficult, because your life isn’t over just because you or a loved one got sick. In the mean time, we have to help each other, and I hope to do my part by not letting the truth die out. If you are also a person with classic M.E. or their carer, I invite you to share your story with the world, as well.

“If you destroy the record, you destroy the truth.

I’ve learned in my adult life that the will to silence the truth is always and everywhere as strong as the truth itself. So it is a necessary fight we will always be in: those of us who struggle to understand our common truths, and those who try to erase them. …

All so precious and fragile. Don’t let anyone tell you that the truth can’t disappear. If I believe in anything, rather than God, it’s that I am part of something that goes all the way back to Antigone, and that whatever speaks the truth of our hearts can only make us stronger. Can only give us the power to counter the hate and bigotry and heal this addled world.

Just remember: You are not alone.”
(Paul Monette, “Last Watch of the Night: Essays Too Personal and Otherwise.”)

Until next time…

a rainbow at night


Books and Materials on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis:
  • Missed diagnoses: Myalgic Encephalomyelitis & chronic fatigue syndrome (2nd ed.), by: Byron M. Hyde, M.D. with a foreword by Professor Malcolm Hooper. (2011)
  • The Clinical and scientific basis of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, by: Jay A. Goldstein, M.D. and Byron M. Hyde, M.D. (1992)
  • Myalgic encephalomyelitis and postviral fatigue states: The saga of Royal Free disease (2nd ed.), by: Melvin A. Ramsay, M.D. (1988)
  • More to be added

The Parts of ME: Introduction & History: How did we get here?

It takes a long time for me to integrate new information.

And as anyone in the ME community knows, we’ve had a ton of that since February. Instead of blindly powering through, waiting has given me a month to gather facts, opinions, and input from our advocacy leaders, my trusted friends, and even the IOM committee members. The best way for me to write and for you to read (that is, if you want) is to break it into parts.

Please note that each post will be able to stand on its own: Don’t fret about having to remember plot-lines from week to week; this is not a story. This is definitely. not. a story.

But first, I need to take this chance to say:

Thank you for supporting us in our fundraising, but I no longer stand behind MEAdvocacy.org. If you’ve been following the new Facebook page you’ll notice I mentioned having some surprising news, and this was it. Then, after watching their two-minute video on a local news station which (1) failed to mention “myalgic encephalomyelitis” even once, and (2) made those diagnosed with severe “CFS” appear as if their main disability is fatigue, I had confirmation that I wanted out. I feel they’ve missed multiple opportunities to spread proper knowledge of M.E. as promised. I also disagree with them removing the commenting option on their blog without telling our members where we could go to further communicate with each other. They also archived their original donation page to hide all mention of M.E. and their goals unless you click to specifically see the archived post, which I have a problem with. I had been very hopeful based on their objectives in the beginning, and despite the organization claiming nothing has changed, myself and many others feel deceived and have zero faith in MEAdvocacy.org’s ability to use our money for those original purposes. It’s difficult to imagine a scenario in which this would suddenly turn around. However, I do not regret donating and neither should you–at the time, we thought it was the right decision, and we raised thousands for what we believed in: Look what we can do! I only wish I was in a position to start a group, myself. As for Brooke–who is doing extremely poorly at the moment, I’m sorry to say–you can read her 4-tweet-long public statement here, here, here, then here.

All right. Fasten your seat-belts, gather your friends, because here we go. It’s time to make some sense out of all this.


The Parts of M.E. (Upcoming posts)
  1. Introduction & History: How did we get here?
  2. What if it were you?
  3. Does “Post Exertional Malaise (PEM)” exist in other diseases?
  4. The IOM Committee Speaks Out
  5. The Problem with M.E.-only Advocacy, and How SEID May Help
  6. Does encephalomyelitis really exist in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME)?
  7. The ICC or CCC as an M.E. definition: Are we promoting bad science?
  8. Why do we advocate?
Some of these might be combined or further segregated as I go along. Using everything I’ve sporadically written over the past month, I’ll compile and post these hopefully, potentially once a week, starting now.

Let’s begin by clearing something up: How did we get here? The confusion between M.E. and similar states has always been a point of controversy. Today’s over-inclusion involves M.E. vs Any other disease with chronic fatigue; pre-CFS the over-inclusion was of M.E. vs. Any other disease with chronic post-viral fatigue. These illnesses have also always been thought by many to be purely psychological in origin…along with 95% of all other ailments, because that’s just what people did back then. (Hysterical wandering uterus, anyone?)

But why hasn’t M.E. moved forward with all the others, especially after decades of documented outbreaks and with so much research proving it’s an acquired disease of non-mental origin? The major denial of M.E. in both the US and UK has stemmed from people with too much power failing to examine a single patient.

McEvedy and Beard–both psychiatrists*–wrote their deplorable 1970 re-analysis of the 1955 Royal Free epidemic without doing a physical examination on a single patient, basing their feedback on data which they decided could just as easily have been hysteria…not out of some moral obligation to scrutinize data, but because *McEvedy was a psychiatry student who needed an easy paper to write for his PhD.* Professor Hooper writes of this:

“McEvedy stated that he did not examine any patients and undertook only the most cursory examination of medical records. This was a source of great distress to Melvin Ramsay who carried out the first meticulous study of the Royal Free outbreak. The outcome of McEvedy’s work has been described by one of the ME/CFS charities as “the psychiatric fallacy”.” (1)

Dr. Hyde writes of his personal visit with McEvedy in 1988:

“Why had he written up the Free Hospital epidemics as hysteria without any careful exploration of the basis of his thesis? I asked.

His reply was devastating.

He said, ‘It was an easy PhD, why not’.” (2)

While over in the US, it is well-known that the CDC did the exact same thing: In response to several 1980s M.E. outbreaks, CDC investigators looked only at patient charts–NOT actual patients–and returned to their offices to make jokes about our presumed “hysteria.” It wasn’t until the doctors attempting to manage these outbreaks took over $200,000 of their own money to pay for MRIs, that they found their patients had brain lesions indistinguishable from those found in people with AIDS; because these findings were not seen in ALL patients, they were not taken seriously, despite being consistent with myalgic encephalomyelitis. In 1988, the CDC christened the continuing outbreaks as a new illness–chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)–effectively because three M.E. experts left the committee early due to a lack of patient information and the remaining committee’s preoccupation with Epstein-Barr Syndrome. (2)

From the criteria that developed to study CFS (which was only intended “to provide a rational basis for evaluating patients who have chronic fatigue of undetermined cause” because physicians did not take the illness seriously), we have helped cultivate an old mess that still exists today: Thousands of people diagnosed with everything under the sun, whose illness is being called myalgic encephalomyelitis. This includes thousands who don’t meet even a single criterion for what was actually M.E. before the invention of CFS or the watered down post-CFS model of ME that exists in many countries today.

As you can see, this is the reason some diagnosed with CFS do have M.E., and the reason much research does still apply to M.E. even if the titles “CFS” or “ME/CFS” are used. The trick lies in checking the methodology: If patients were selected using the ICC or CCC (especially in addition to another criteria), there’s an excellent chance the results could apply to classic ME. If they were selected to meet certain additional M.E.-like criteria, such as a post-viral onset, even better. But if patients only had to meet one CFS criteria (or something equally nonsensical, such as the UK’s “NICE guidelines for CFS/ME”), proceed with caution, because this may mean the only thing the participants had in common was “a fatiguing illness.”

“Even if the truth is buried for centuries, it will eventually come out and thrive.” (Burmese Proverb)

To be continued…

a rainbow at night

(P.S. – I thought I should finally publish a Facebook page so I can be engaged with the wonderful groups and people there, and also share things that are both too long for my twitter and too short for blog posts. Watch it for updates of new posts, things relevant to ‪‎Myalgic Encephalomyelitis‬ and related diseases, ‪Lyme Disease‬ and related content, ‪Buddhism‬ and ‪spirituality‬ (theists and non-theists welcome), ‪Mindfulness‬ and other meditations, ‪‎coping‬, ‪advocacy, and more. You CAN post to the page, but things will be moderated–checked by me for inappropriate content before they go public–to keep it a safe place: Differing opinions are NOT seen as confrontational, just don’t talk down to others. :) Thank you for your “Like”!)

Explaining to Those with “ME/CFS” That They Cannot Have Both

Here are some things I used to think about people who tried to tell me chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was different from myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME):

  1. They’re just trying to cause a problem where there isn’t one.
  2. They’re “those advocacy-type people” who “make a big deal out of everything.”
  3. They just want it to sound more serious, when it’s actually the same illness.
  4. It really doesn’t matter what people call it; they just want their disease to be “special.”

Yes, I *legitimately used to think these things.*

Have you ever wondered why people continue using terms like “ME/CFS” “CFIDS/ME” (and now “ME/SEID”), despite being confronted with information that clearly details their differences? Ever wanted to inform someone you care about, but aren’t sure how?

I recently witnessed this beautiful exchange of words that took place across several days, about what all too often happens when people try to educate others on this matter. Brooke and her friends have graciously allowed me to post their conversation on why people resist this truth so fervently, as a guide for all of our understanding.

(She would post it on her own blog, but now lacks the cognitive flexibility to organize and edit as I’ve been blessed to accomplish here over the past week. I’ve edited the quotations only to clarify the intended meaning and combat the effects of cognitive disability.)

“All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.” Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher


Renee Roszkowski: “Just got called ‘disrespectful’ for trying to educate on the fact that M.E. and CFS are not the same thing and the term ME/CFS is not really a good term.”

Brooke: “I’m sorry to hear that. Unfortunately, it’s not too uncommon for (some) people diagnosed with CFS to get upset when people try to explain the difference. I can understand: They go so long not knowing what’s wrong with them, being judged, told it’s all in their heads, etc, and then a doctor finally gives them a diagnosis frequently linked together with a very real, fairly well-understood, officially recognized neurological disorder, so they want to cling to that. Being told they may not have M.E. (and most likely don’t), puts them back in the position of, “Well, then what’s wrong with me?” And that’s difficult to accept.

It’s hard for those diagnosed with CFS to accept that they *don’t* actually have a diagnosed illness, yet; that all they have is a diagnosis that says doctors don’t know what their diagnosis is; that it’s not a single, treatable illness able to be researched like so many have been led to believe (despite it having never been intended for CFS to be seen that way ¹). Finding out that they need to go back to pushing doctors to do whatever tests are necessary to find their *true* diagnosis can be extremely disheartening. But as you know, people (mis)diagnosed with CFS claiming they have M.E. doesn’t help them any more than someone with bronchitis claiming they have lung cancer would be helped. It only hurts both groups.

It’s just difficult to help people get past the initial frustration or fear-induced reaction of disbelief, and help them move on to the idea of, “Hey, if I don’t actually have M.E., there’s a decent chance whatever I *do* have has at least some level of treatment available–maybe even a cure.” It’s difficult to go back to pushing for answers, but it is oh-so-worth-it for those who finally find them, and find some level of relief from their symptoms!

The more people spread the truth, the more it helps all of us.”

Renee: “I can totally understand, having been diagnosed with CFS, but actually having Chronic Epstein-Barr Virus, endometriosis, probable POTS (not yet diagnosed but I meet the diagnostic criteria), and potentially having a thyroid disorder, ALL of which have fatigue as a major symptom. I totally understand.”

Brooke: “Yeah, a lot of people diagnosed with CFS also have other diagnoses, which is kind of crazy if those other diagnoses can explain their fatigue, because a requirement for a CFS diagnosis is that your fatigue is not explained by any other illness ² (again differing from M.E., which, like any other neurological illness, you can have even if you also have other conditions causing similar symptoms). Why do doctors diagnose people with CFS if their symptoms are explained by other (testable) conditions? Not only is that medically incorrect/[completely against the criteria for diagnosis], it just doesn’t make sense to me. Diagnosing these individuals with CFS [when other conditions explain their symptoms] then saying it’s the same as M.E., is like doctors issuing a statement that everybody with a condition that causes any form of fatigue will now also be diagnosed with cancer.

Jennifer Phillips: “What people mean is too often not what actually gets heard. ‘CFS is not a real diagnosis’ can all too easily get heard as ‘CFS is not a real disease and you’re making up how sick you are.’ 

You need to approach it like this:

“You probably know that CFS captures a lot of different diseases that doctors just don’t know how to diagnose, right? People with CFS are sick, but not all in the same way. But M.E. has a distinct diagnosis and known cause. So if you’ve been diagnosed with CFS, you may or may not have M.E., depending on if the doctors have done these diagnostic tests or not. If you don’t have neurological problems, you probably do not have ME. This does not mean you are not sick, but that the knowledge about M.E. likely can’t help you and chances are your doctors need to keep figuring out what your CFS really is from.

Brooke: “That’s generally how I approach it when explaining to people who don’t already know all this stuff. I’m a bit more blunt (or rather, I just don’t take the time/energy to be extra careful in wording) with people who I know already get it and have the same views, but I agree, when educating you do have to be careful not to come across as saying the person is not sick. Most people diagnosed with CFS have heard that too much in their lives, and will be quick to get defensive–I know, because at one point I, too, was (mis)diagnosed with CFS. The vast majority of people with CFS don’t have M.E., so in a way I ‘lucked out’ once I had the CFS diagnosis, in that it wasn’t too hard to find the accurate diagnosis from there (with the proper tests to correctly diagnose it). But I do think most people with CFS have at least one physical illness of some kind. Even for those whose illness is psychiatric (for example, one study found over 30% of individuals with Major Depression are misdiagnosed with CFS ³), that’s nothing to look down on. There are often very real chemical/physical causes behind mental illness, too. They simply need to find the truth, whatever their true diagnosis is, so they can look for appropriate treatments.

Renee: “I told them that I have CFS and a friend with ME, so I don’t think I sounded dismissive.”

Brooke:One of the issues I see all too often is that many CFS patients actually *don’t know* that CFS includes people with lots of different illnesses. They’ve actually been told by their doctors and others that CFS is one single illness (“otherwise, why/how would anyone research it?”) and that “it” is synonymous with ME. They think that as long as you have unexplained fatigue lasting six months or longer, you have ME. Getting people to understand that (1) there is no single “it” when it comes to CFS, (2) that ME is something *entirely* different (most M.E. patients don’t even list “feeling fatigued” as a major symptom; our fatigue is at a cellular level and can contribute to the transient paralysis many of us experience), and (3) that *every* diagnosis of CFS is a misdiagnosis [because CFS is not a single disease but a diagnosis given when you have unexplained fatigue, nowadays particularly when you have unexplained fatigue with a post-exertional crash] – that can be a real challenge.”

Jennifer: “Which is why I phrase that point up front, as something they either know or don’t know, *not* something open to debate or telling them what to believe. Like you said, that confusion is why you want to educate people.”

Richard Heckart: “A closed mind is worse than an empty one. That’s my new saying from now on. Pass it on.”


To additionally put this in perspective for you:

It’d be like if the government suddenly stopped diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis and started calling all new cases “Weak Leg Syndrome,” deciding that the primary symptom of this new syndrome is weak legs. Eventually it gets dubbed “MS/Weak Leg Syndrome.” And now they’re saying that all you have to do to help weak leg syndrome is exercise because some people got better that way; they think other people simply have weak legs because they’re too depressed to move. Oh, and because MS = Weak Leg Syndrome now, no one ever gets diagnosed with actual MS anymore, so people with actual MS never get the correct life-saving treatment, therefore everyone who actually has Multiple Sclerosis, dies. Sounds crazy, right? Can you see this actually happening with any other well-known disease like this? Not at all. But that’s what happened to us.

So I hope people understand we are not just trying to nag you, or get validation for “our special disease” while leaving out everyone else. This isn’t a club anyone wants to be in. We recognize completely that everyone is suffering because of this international confusion, and because you can’t reliably study anything that isn’t clearly defined, no matter how many times they rename it or move around the same criteria, CFS still won’t be its own disease. There was no need to create CFIDS/CFS/SEID when the illness occurring in the 1980s epidemics already had diagnostic criteria, already had a known cause, and already had a name: Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. But instead of continuing to use it, the government created something entirely different, and all government-funded research on people with classic M.E. abruptly stopped. If you get diagnosed with CFS but don’t meet the diagnosis for the original illness (M.E.), it means you have something else that your doctors haven’t yet identified, ranging from the potentially treatable to the potentially fatal. So please continue to educate yourselves, *and* your doctors, because they are not omnipotent gods incapable of mistakes. There are also things you can do to slow down the progression of M.E., if you do indeed have it.

I have a friend in the UK who’s been diagnosed with “ME/CFS” for several years and she hasn’t even been given an MRI–yet she’s in a wheelchair, getting worse, and shows several defining symptoms of MS… Or maybe she just has Weak Leg Syndrome and needs to walk it off…

a rainbow at night


Resources for M.E. and CFS

Note: Because of thirty years of confusion, some information labeled under CFS may be relevant to M.E., since some researchers use additional characteristics and biomarkers to select for different subsets of patients, for example, selecting the most severely affected (which through no coincidence, tend to be those with M.E., often due to years of being told to exercise when this leads to disease progression and premature death).

(1) Holmes, G. (1988). Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Working Case Definition. Annals of Internal Medicine, 387-387. “We also present a working definition for the chronic fatigue syndrome designed to improve the comparability and reproducibility of clinical research and epidemiologic studies, and to provide a rational basis for evaluating patients who have chronic fatigue of undetermined cause.
(2) The IOM recommended on Tuesday, February 10, 2015, that this requirement be lifted, but please bear in mind this has not yet been implemented by the CDC or become customary for doctors; diagnoses of CFS are still and have always been made on the basis of unexplained fatigue, whereby any other diagnosis is supposed to disqualify you from having CFS, because CFS is a diagnosis of exclusion, i.e., not a specific illness but a category people are put in when doctors cannot explain your fatigue and other symptoms, even if your symptom of fatigue is post-exertional fatigue.
(3) Jason et al. Evaluating the Centers for Disease Control’s Empirical Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Case Definition. (2008). Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 20(2), 93-100. Almost 2 of every 5 people diagnosed with Major Depression meet all the criteria for CFS, too. “Findings indicated that 38% of those with a diagnosis of a Major Depressive Disorder were misclassified as having CFS using the new CDC definition.”

It’s not easy, it’s just Now.

The Nutcracker

“Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.” (Oscar Wilde)

When I look back at all that I’ve done over the past year, it really blows my mind. And I did it all because I first made the choice to live and enjoy within the confines of my circumstances, just like I did last year. I set in my mind what I wanted, made whatever arrangements I could on my own to help them manifest, and let the Universe work out the rest based on what I needed to experience.

If I wasn’t supposed to have something yet (or at all), well it wouldn’t have been from my lack of trying.

I’m not completely certain of the point for me writing this… I know the things I lived, I don’t need further documentation. I don’t imagine they’d be all that interesting to anyone else, in the same way your baby photos are only important to you, and slide shows of your vacations need to be ambushed upon unsuspecting house guests if you plan to share them.

Even if I were to sit here and explain how none of it would have happened if I just blindly accepted the identity of “sick person” that most family members and even doctors wanted to give me (and that for too many years I gave to myself, as well), because “sick people” don’t live life, they wait until they’re not so sick to start enjoying themselves again, right? They wait until they’re better, don’t they…? (Not so much.)

No, people only hear what they want to hear, and until they’re ready to change, all of it only looks like “of course YOU did it, you [insert excuse here for why it’s easier for everyone else besides you].” Or some want to be spoonfed the exact steps in order to do only as much work as is absolutely necessary. To quote inspirational speaker, minister, and author Iyanla Vanzant, “You must be willing to do the work.”

And yet more than a few people said to me during a week’s worth of time, that they wished something in their life was as easy as I seem to have it………………………..

I couldn’t help but laugh.

Because nothing–absolutely nothing–has come easy for me. No one comes to acquire these traits that make life seem “easy,” because life actually WAS easy. No, they arise from hardship, and those currently living in the troughs are knee-deep in the circumstances that produce any qualities in me you claim to admire.

What one might perceive as my ease of living is actually my choice to experience it as such, not any representation of the actual work required. I’ve metaphorically crossed over mountains to get to this place from where I was, because I was not raised to be peaceful. (Please read that. Okay?)

The “of course it’s easy for you” thing is also troubling because it’s an unconscious confession of (fear) self-sabotage, the excuses you’re telling yourself for why you can’t have what someone else has. It’s giving yourself an “out” based on something external you’re unable to control or something internal you perceive yourself not to have, helping foster the belief that your situation is out of your hands, so why bother? It’s a destructive twin of “I’ll be happy when…”

You can have a radically different life without changing a single external circumstance, because the only common denominator in your entire existence, is You.

Our lives aren’t defined by only the big decisions, goals, and occurrences. However much impact they have on the rest of our days, those major game-changers are few and far between. Society tells us from the day we step outside that your life is supposed to be about getting from point A to point B, and to pass your days filling in the rest with your to-do list of how to accomplish that. But that’s incorrect. That is NOT all life has to offer, and when you finally get to all those point B’s, you’re going to realize that. So listen to all of us “hippies” who are trying to get your attention before then:

Life is made up of all the little moments you encounter between those perceived checkpoints. It’s all the smaller things you do day in, and day out, that make up the most of your life and help determine your happiness.

And I guess that’s why it doesn’t matter too much to me anymore to explain all that I’ve accomPLISHED even with the accomPLICE of disease… Because the gift of those experiences will reside within me, always. And although reaching those goals was inexplicably amazing, it’s the process of living and thinking that helped me manifest them at all, which holds the most value in the long run. And that’s the part I really want to share with this blog.

If you want things to be easier, it doesn’t start with changing your circumstances. Because you can only manipulate your circumstances to the extent that you realize what is really yours to control. And that all starts with manipulating you.

 

a rainbow at night